siddur

siddur

[Sephardic Hebrew see-door; Ashkenazic Hebrew si-duhr, si-door; English sid-er]
noun, plural siddurim [Sephardic Hebrew see-doo-reem; Ashkenazic Hebrew si-doo-rim] . English, siddurs. Hebrew.
a Jewish prayer book designed for use chiefly on days other than festivals and holy days; a daily prayer book.
Compare mahzor.


Origin:
siddūr literally, arrangement

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siddur (siːˈduːr, English ˈsɪdʊə)
 
n , pl -durim, -durs
Judaism the Jewish prayer book
 
[literally: order]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

siddur

Jewish prayer book, which contains the entire Jewish liturgy used on the ordinary sabbath and on weekdays for domestic as well as synagogue ritual. It is distinguished from the mahzor, which is the prayer book used for the High Holidays. The prayers and benedictions of a siddur breathe Old Testament sentiments of praise, thanksgiving, petition, intercession, acknowledgment of sin, and prayers for forgiveness; numerous short verses from the Psalms express these religious feelings. Because tradition long allowed the addition of new prayers and hymns (piyyutim) to voice contemporary needs and aspirations, the siddurim reflect Jewish religious history expressed in liturgy and prayers. Thus, the Exodus still remains the central theme of Passover, a symbol and a sign of hope and trust in God.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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