sidle

[sahyd-l]
verb (used without object), sidled, sidling.
1.
to move sideways or obliquely.
2.
to edge along furtively.
noun
3.
a sidling movement.

Origin:
1690–1700; back formation from sideling (earlier spelling sidling misconstrued as present participle of a verb ending in -le)

sidlingly, adverb
unsidling, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sidle (ˈsaɪdəl)
 
vb
1.  to move in a furtive or stealthy manner; edge along
2.  to move along sideways
 
n
3.  a sideways movement
 
[C17: back formation from obsolete sideling sideways]
 
'sidler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

sidle
"to move or go sideways," 1690s, back-formation from obsolete M.E. sidlyng (adv.) "obliquely, sideways" (early 14c.), from side + adv. suffix -ling; altered on analogy of verbs ending in -le.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The thief would sidle up to its relative quietly in an effort to get at the
  food.
Consumer spending will no more than sidle ahead, and fixed investment will
  continue to decline.
Moments with dialogue are brief and easy to sidle around.
At this intersection, mightier than mine, the cars sidle up three abreast.
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