signal

[sig-nl]
noun
1.
anything that serves to indicate, warn, direct, command, or the like, as a light, a gesture, an act, etc.: a traffic signal; a signal to leave.
2.
anything agreed upon or understood as the occasion for concerted action.
3.
an act, event, or the like that causes or incites some action: The unjust execution was the signal for revolt.
4.
a token; indication.
5.
Electronics. an electrical quantity or effect, as current, voltage, or electromagnetic waves, that can be varied in such a way as to convey information.
6.
Cards. a play that reveals to one's partner a wish that he or she continue or discontinue the suit led.
adjective
7.
serving as a signal; used in signaling: a signal flag.
8.
unusual; notable; outstanding: a signal exploit.
verb (used with object), signaled, signaling or (especially British) signalled, signalling.
9.
to make a signal to.
10.
to communicate or make known by a signal.
verb (used without object), signaled, signaling or (especially British) signalled, signalling.
11.
to make communication by a signal or signals.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English (noun) < Medieval Latin signāle, Late Latin, noun use of neuter of signālis of a sign. See sign, -al2, -al1

signaler; especially British, signaller, noun
presignal, noun, verb (used with object), presignaled, presignaling or (especially British) presignalled, presignaling.
resignal, verb, resignaled, resignaling or (especially British) resignalled, resignalling.
unsignaled, adjective
unsignalled, adjective

signal, single.


1, 4. sign. 8. unique, exceptional, remarkable, striking.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
signal (ˈsɪɡnəl)
 
n
1.  any sign, gesture, token, etc, that serves to communicate information
2.  anything that acts as an incitement to action: the rise in prices was a signal for rebellion
3.  a.  a variable parameter, such as a current or electromagnetic wave, by which information is conveyed through an electronic circuit, communications system, etc
 b.  the information so conveyed
 c.  (as modifier): signal strength; a signal generator
 
adj
4.  distinguished or conspicuous
5.  used to give or act as a signal
 
vb , -nals, -nalling, -nalled, -nals, -naling, -naled
6.  to communicate (a message, etc) to (a person)
 
[C16: from Old French seignal, from Medieval Latin signāle, from Latin signum sign]
 
'signaller
 
n
 
'signaler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

signal
late 14c., from O.Fr. signal, from M.L. signale "a signal," from L.L. signalis (adj.) "used as a signal, pertaining to a sign," from L. signum "signal, sign." The verb is first recorded 1805, from the noun; earlier verb was signalize (1650s).

signal
"remarkable, striking, notable" 1641, from Fr. signalé, pp. of signaler "to distinguish" (see signal (n.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
signal   (sĭg'nəl)  Pronunciation Key 
A fluctuating quantity or impulse whose variations represent information. The amplitude or frequency of voltage, current, electric field strength, light, and sound can be varied as signals representing information.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

SIGNAL definition

language
A synchronous language by Le Guernic et al of INRIA.
["SIGNAL - A Data Flow-Oriented Language for Signal Processing," P. le Guernic, IEEE Trans Acoustics Speech & Signal Proc, ASSP-34(2):362-1986-04-374].
(1996-12-10)

signal definition

operating system
A predefined message sent between two Unix processes or from the kernel to a process. Signals communicate the occurrence of unexpected external events such as the forced termination of a process by the user. Each signal has a unique number associated with it and each process has a signal handler set for each signal. Signals can be sent using the kill system call.
(1996-12-10)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
What is the best way of sending a strong signal to the boss that he should not
  be blaming me.
Taking on debt might signal that a company is confident about future profits.
Radioactive sulphur signal adds to evidence of catastrophe.
Complexity researchers who study the behavior of stock markets may have
  identified a signal that precedes crashes.
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