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signpost

[sahyn-pohst] /ˈsaɪnˌpoʊst/
noun
1.
a post bearing a sign that gives information or guidance.
2.
any immediately perceptible indication, obvious clue, etc.
verb (used with object)
3.
to provide (a place, route, etc.) with signposts.
Origin of signpost
1610-1620
1610-20; sign + post1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for signpost
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • To get to that country, O children of a king, you would have to turn and turn, and spell out every signpost.

    Hints to Pilgrims Charles Stephen Brooks
  • Surely he must presently come to some village, or some signpost.

    The Magic World Edith Nesbit
  • There was a signpost of silvery snow, and on it in letters of pure ice the children read: This way to the North Pole.

    The Book of Dragons Edith Nesbit
  • Once he stopped, and with the aid of a lamp from the car found a signpost.

    A Bachelor Husband Ruby M. Ayres
  • "Let us follow the path back to the signpost," suggested Billina.

    The Emerald City of Oz L. Frank Baum
  • Sorrow's crown of sorrow is, however, attained when a signpost is seen in the distance.

    The Cornish Coast (South) Charles G. Harper
  • Michael nodded, saluting, so to speak, the signpost into the future as he passed it.

    Michael E. F. Benson
British Dictionary definitions for signpost

signpost

/ˈsaɪnˌpəʊst/
noun
1.
a post bearing a sign that shows the way, as at a roadside
2.
something that serves as a clue or indication; sign
verb (transitive; usually passive)
3.
to mark with signposts
4.
to indicate direction towards: the camp site is signposted from the road
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for signpost
n.

also sign-post, 1610s, "sign on a post, usually indicating an inn or shop," from sign (n.) + post (n.1). Meaning "guide- or direction-post along a road" is attested from 1863. Figurative sense is from 1889.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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