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silly

[sil-ee] /ˈsɪl i/
adjective, sillier, silliest.
1.
weak-minded or lacking good sense; stupid or foolish:
a silly writer.
2.
absurd; ridiculous; irrational:
a silly idea.
3.
stunned; dazed:
He knocked me silly.
4.
Cricket. (of a fielder or the fielder's playing position) extremely close to the batsman's wicket:
silly mid off.
5.
Archaic. rustic; plain; homely.
6.
Archaic. weak; helpless.
7.
Obsolete. lowly in rank or state; humble.
noun, plural sillies.
8.
Informal. a silly or foolish person:
Don't be such a silly.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; earlier sylie, sillie foolish, feeble-minded, simple, pitiful; late Middle English syly, variant of sely seely
Related forms
sillily, adverb
silliness, noun
unsilly, adjective
Synonyms
1. witless, senseless, dull-witted, dim-witted. See foolish. 2. inane, asinine, nonsensical, preposterous.
Antonyms
1. sensible.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for silliness
  • The article compounds the silliness by muddling silicon and silane together and considering cadmium panels as a safer alternative.
  • Od course, the major silliness of this article is that it claims that the amount of an energy resources determines it value.
  • But it's the silliness of the submissions that has us baffled.
  • There is far too much parroting of jingoistic silliness that distracts everyone from the real issues.
  • Nowadays, looking around the nation, one sees relatively little in the way of epic silliness.
  • But there's a still more important reason for the silliness that's inherent in the parodies.
  • No, when you come down to it, they are props in a piece of high-toned silliness.
  • Gang's achievement has more to do with freeing us from such silliness.
  • In one's eagerness to remain within the emotional aura of a memorable game one laps up any silliness.
  • Thought it was quite free of science related silliness and obvious mistakes, which made it much easier to suspend disbelief.
British Dictionary definitions for silliness

silly

/ˈsɪlɪ/
adjective -lier, -liest
1.
lacking in good sense; absurd
2.
frivolous, trivial, or superficial
3.
feeble-minded
4.
dazed, as from a blow
5.
(obsolete) homely or humble
noun
6.
(modifier) (cricket) (of a fielding position) near the batsman's wicket silly mid-on
7.
(informal) Also called silly-billy, (pl) -lies. a foolish person
Derived Forms
silliness, noun
Word Origin
C15 (in the sense: pitiable, hence the later senses: foolish): from Old English sǣlig (unattested) happy, from sǣl happiness; related to Gothic sēls good
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for silliness
n.

"foolishness," c.1600, from silly + -ness; a reformation of seeliness, from Old English saelignes "happiness, (good) fortune, occurrence."

silly

adj.

Old English gesælig "happy, fortuitous, prosperous" (related to sæl "happiness"), from Proto-Germanic *sæligas (cf. Old Norse sæll "happy," Old Saxon salig, Middle Dutch salich, Old High German salig, German selig "blessed, happy, blissful," Gothic sels "good, kindhearted"), from PIE *sele- "of good mood; to favor," from root *sel- (2) "happy, of good mood; to favor" (cf. Latin solari "to comfort," Greek hilaros "cheerful, gay, merry, joyous").

This is one of the few instances in which an original long e (ee) has become shortened to i. The same change occurs in breeches, and in the American pronunciation of been, with no change in spelling. [Century Dictionary]
The word's considerable sense development moved from "happy" to "blessed" to "pious," to "innocent" (c.1200), to "harmless," to "pitiable" (late 13c.), "weak" (c.1300), to "feeble in mind, lacking in reason, foolish" (1570s). Further tendency toward "stunned, dazed as by a blow" (1886) in knocked silly, etc. Silly season in journalism slang is from 1861 (August and September, when newspapers compensate for a lack of hard news by filling up with trivial stories). Silly Putty trademark claims use from July 1949.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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