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simulate

[v. sim-yuh-leyt; adj. sim-yuh-lit, -leyt] /v. ˈsɪm yəˌleɪt; adj. ˈsɪm yə lɪt, -ˌleɪt/
verb (used with object), simulated, simulating.
1.
to create a simulation, likeness, or model of (a situation, system, or the like):
to simulate crisis conditions.
2.
to make a pretense of; feign:
to simulate knowledge.
3.
to assume or have the appearance or characteristics of:
He simulated the manners of the rich.
adjective
4.
Archaic. simulated.
Origin of simulate
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin simulātus (past participle of simulāre), equivalent to simul- (variant of simil-, base of similis similar) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
simulative, simulatory
[sim-yuh-luh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ˈsɪm yə ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
simulatively, adverb
nonsimulate, adjective
nonsimulative, adjective
unsimulated, adjective
unsimulating, adjective
unsimulative, adjective
well-simulated, adjective
Synonyms
2. pretend, counterfeit. 3. affect.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for simulated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Shirley, with cumbersome effort helped her with her cloak, dropping his hat and stick more than once in simulated awkwardness.

    The Voice on the Wire Eustace Hale Ball
  • He went to the window and opened the missive with simulated indifference.

    Casanova's Homecoming Arthur Schnitzler
  • Ought I to have heard her story with sympathy, or at least, with simulated sympathy?

    The Yellow House E. Phillips Oppenheim
  • That cannot be simulated; the pretense of it is in general, in the long run, futile.

  • Behind the simulated cheer of his greeting there was something else which Old Jerry found disturbingly new and hard to place.

    Once to Every Man Larry Evans
British Dictionary definitions for simulated

simulated

/ˈsɪmjʊˌleɪtɪd/
adjective
1.
(of fur, leather, pearls, etc) being an imitation of the genuine article, usually made from cheaper material
2.
(of actions, qualities, emotions, etc) imitated; feigned

simulate

verb (transitive) (ˈsɪmjʊˌleɪt)
1.
to make a pretence of; feign: to simulate anxiety
2.
to reproduce the conditions of (a situation, etc), as in carrying out an experiment: to simulate weightlessness
3.
to assume or have the appearance of; imitate
adjective (ˈsɪmjʊlɪt; -ˌleɪt)
4.
(archaic) assumed or simulated
Derived Forms
simulative, adjective
simulatively, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from Latin simulāre to copy, from similis like
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for simulated
adj.

1620s, "feigned," past participle adjective from simulate (v.). Meaning "imitative for purposes of experiment or training" is from 1966 (agent noun simulator in the related sense dates from 1947; cf. simulation). In commercial jargon, "artificial, imitation" by 1942.

simulate

v.

1620s, "feign, pretend, assume falsely" (implied in simulated), back-formation from simulation or else from Latin simulatus, past participle of simulare "to make like, imitate, copy." Meaning "to use a model to imitate certain conditions for purposes of study or training" is from 1947. Related: Simulating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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