slat

1 [slat]
noun
1.
a long thin, narrow strip of wood, metal, etc., used as a support for a bed, as one of the horizontal laths of a Venetian blind, etc.
2.
Aeronautics. a control surface along the leading edge of a wing that can be extended forward to create a gap (slot) to improve airflow.
3.
slats, Slang.
a.
the ribs.
b.
the buttocks.
c.
(initial capital letter) a nickname for a tall, slender man.
verb (used with object), slatted, slatting.
4.
to furnish or make with slats.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English sclat, slatt a slate < Middle French esclat splinter, fragment; see éclat

Dictionary.com Unabridged

slat

2 [slat] Chiefly British Dialect.
verb (used with object), slatted, slatting.
1.
to throw or dash with force.
verb (used without object), slatted, slatting.
2.
to flap violently, as sails.
noun
3.
a slap; a sharp blow.

Origin:
1815–25; < Old Norse sletta to splash, strike

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
slat1 (slæt)
 
n
1.  a narrow thin strip of wood or metal, as used in a Venetian blind, etc
2.  a movable or fixed auxiliary aerofoil attached to the leading edge of an aircraft wing to increase lift, esp during landing and takeoff
 
vb , slats, slatting, slatted
3.  (tr) to provide with slats
 
[C14: from Old French esclat splinter, from esclater to shatter]

slat2 (slæt)
 
vb , slats, slatting, slatted
1.  (tr) to throw violently; fling carelessly
2.  (intr) to flap violently
 
n
3.  a sudden blow
 
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse, Icelandic sletta to slap]

slat3 (slæt)
 
n
(Irish) a spent salmon
 
[C19: of uncertain origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

slat
1382, "a roofing slate," from O.Fr. esclat "split piece, splinter," back-formation from esclater "to break, splinter, burst," probably from Frank. *slaitan "to tear, slit," related to O.H.G. slizan, O.E. slitan (see slit). Meaning "long, thin, narrow piece of wood or metal" attested from 1764.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He would tie it inside the shreds of clothing his captors provided, or tuck it away beneath a bunk slat at night.
Lifting a slat from the floor, he withdraws a cloth-wrapped opium pipe from a hidden compartment.
In addition, the recalled cribs can pose a serious entrapment and strangulation hazard when a slat is damaged.
The café has the feel of a fishing lodge, with wood-slat tables and waiters' stations made of half canoes standing upright.
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