sleight

[slahyt]
noun
1.
skill; dexterity.
2.
an artifice; stratagem.
3.
cunning; craft.

Origin:
1225–75; Middle English; early Middle English slēgth < Old Norse slǣgth. See sly, -th1

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World English Dictionary
sleight (slaɪt)
 
n
1.  See also sleight of hand skill; dexterity
2.  a trick or stratagem
3.  cunning; trickery
 
[C14: from Old Norse slægth, from slægrsly]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sleight
"cunning," c.1275, from O.N. sloegð "cleverness, cunning, slyness," from sloegr (see sly). Term sleight of hand is attested from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Phony, sleight of hand false equivalency right there.
Does he think that no one will notice this sleight of hand.
But the length and depth of the recession are forcing governments to go beyond
  sleight of hand to genuine cuts.
But with expert sleight of hand, he is able to find artistic benefits as well.
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