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slogan

[sloh-guh n] /ˈsloʊ gən/
noun
1.
a distinctive cry, phrase, or motto of any party, group, manufacturer, or person; catchword or catch phrase.
2.
a war cry or gathering cry, as formerly used among the Scottish clans.
Origin
1505-1515
1505-15; < Scots Gaelic sluagh-ghairm, equivalent to sluagh army, host (cf. slew2) + gairm cry
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for slogans
  • We can not permit ourselves to be narrowed and dwarfed by slogans and phrases.
  • Yet the election buzz continued, with parties dusting down campaign slogans and plans.
  • There is some truth to these allegations, but less than the slogans allege.
  • Ensconced in manicured barracks with pitched roofs, its leaders have struggled to turn slogans into actions.
  • He answers them in slogans that he gives every appearance of believing.
  • Outside, a group of angry youths parade around the block, shouting anti-government slogans.
  • Satin banners and propaganda posters with slogans to inspire civic pride were everywhere.
  • After a shooting, outreach workers hand out leaflets, chant anti-violence slogans and put signs on people's lawns.
  • Economic history has been discarded in favor of new slogans and old destructive ideas.
  • Back then many ballots sported a more elaborate mix of slogans, typefaces, pictures and colors than the one shown here.
British Dictionary definitions for slogans

slogan

/ˈsləʊɡən/
noun
1.
a distinctive or topical phrase used in politics, advertising, etc
2.
(Scot, history) a Highland battle cry
Word Origin
C16: from Gaelic sluagh-ghairm war cry, from sluagh army + gairm cry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for slogans

slogan

n.

1670s, earlier slogorne (1510s), "battle cry," from Gaelic sluagh-ghairm "battle cry used by Scottish Highland or Irish clans," from sluagh "army, host, slew," from Celtic and Balto-Slavic *slough- "help, service." Second element is gairm "a cry" (see garrulous). Metaphoric sense of "distinctive word or phrase used by a political or other group" is first attested 1704.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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