slope

[slohp]
verb (used without object), sloped, sloping.
1.
to have or take an inclined or oblique direction or angle considered with reference to a vertical or horizontal plane; slant.
2.
to move at an inclination or obliquely: They sloped gradually westward.
verb (used with object), sloped, sloping.
3.
to direct at a slant or inclination; incline from the horizontal or vertical: The sun sloped its beams.
4.
to form with a slope or slant: to slope an embankment.
noun
5.
ground that has a natural incline, as the side of a hill.
6.
inclination or slant, especially downward or upward.
7.
deviation from the horizontal or vertical.
8.
an inclined surface.
9.
Usually, slopes. hills, especially foothills or bluffs: the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro.
10.
Mathematics.
a.
the tangent of the angle between a given straight line and the x- axis of a system of Cartesian coordinates.
b.
the derivative of the function whose graph is a given curve evaluated at a designated point.
11.
Slang: Disparaging and Offensive. an Asian, especially a Vietnamese.
Idioms
12.
slope off, Chiefly British Slang. to make one's way out slowly or furtively.

Origin:
1495–1505; aphetic variant of aslope; akin to slip1

slopingly, adverb
slopingness, noun
unsloped, adjective
unsloping, adjective


1. Slope, slant mean to incline away from a relatively straight surface or line used as a reference. To slope is to incline vertically in an oblique direction: The ground slopes (upward or downward ) sharply here. To slant is to fall to one side, to lie obliquely to some line whether horizontal or perpendicular: The road slants off to the right.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
slope (sləʊp)
 
vb
1.  to lie or cause to lie at a slanting or oblique angle
2.  (intr) (esp of natural features) to follow an inclined course: many paths sloped down the hillside
3.  (intr; foll by off, away, etc) to go furtively
4.  (tr) military (formerly) to hold (a rifle) in the slope position (esp in the command slope arms)
 
n
5.  an inclined portion of ground
6.  (plural) hills or foothills
7.  any inclined surface or line
8.  the degree or amount of such inclination
9.  maths
 a.  (of a line) the tangent of the angle between the line and another line parallel to the x-axis
 b.  the first derivative of the equation of a curve at a given point
10.  (formerly) the position adopted for British military drill when the rifle is rested on the shoulder
11.  slang, derogatory (US) a person from Southeast Asia, especially a Vietnamese
 
[C15: short for aslope, perhaps from the past participle of Old English āslūpan to slip away, from slūpan to slip]
 
'sloper
 
n
 
'sloping
 
adj
 
'slopingly
 
adv
 
'slopingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

slope
1590s, from earlier adj. meaning "slanting" (c.1500), probably from M.E. aslope (adv.) "on the incline" (late 15c.), from O.E. *aslopen, pp. of aslupan "to slip away," from a- "away" + slupan "to slip" (see sleeve). The noun is first recorded 1610s, from the verb. Derogatory
slang meaning "Oriental person" is attested from 1948.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The shelf ends at a break, where the increased steepness is defined as the
  continental slope.
Finally she planted agaves, aloes, and other species to cover the slope without
  blocking ocean views.
Slope also affects airflow: warm air rises, cold air sinks.
Supply curves in economics still slope upward regardless of who is doing the
  instructing.
Image for slope
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