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snail

[sneyl] /sneɪl/
noun
1.
any mollusk of the class Gastropoda, having a spirally coiled shell and a ventral muscular foot on which it slowly glides about.
2.
a slow or lazy person; sluggard.
3.
a cam having the form of a spiral.
4.
Midwestern and Western U.S. a sweet roll in spiral form, especially a cinnamon roll or piece of Danish pastry.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English snail, snayl(e), Old English snegel; cognate with Low German snagel, German (dial.) Schnegel
Related forms
snaillike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for snail
  • The snail population has likewise shifted in response to this predation.
  • If that means running a drill through a snail darters home then so be it.
  • First, a snail eats cow dung rife with the worm's eggs.
  • But some people argue that it is unnecessary, since e-mail easily outpaces even the fastest kind of snail mail.
  • But the case is grinding along at snail's pace, after two years of procedural wrangling.
  • The loss of high-frequency hearing is rooted in the inner ear, which consists of a hollow tube curled up into a snail shape.
  • Higher-paid computer jobs have been added at a snail's pace.
  • The immature parasites drill through the wall of a snail's gut and settle in the digestive gland.
  • Even though snail mail is becoming obsolete, stamps can be true works of art.
  • Paper copies are sent via snail mail to confirm and record what we've already learned online.
British Dictionary definitions for snail

snail

/sneɪl/
noun
1.
any of numerous terrestrial or freshwater gastropod molluscs with a spirally coiled shell, esp any of the family Helicidae, such as Helix aspersa (garden snail)
2.
any other gastropod with a spirally coiled shell, such as a whelk
3.
a slow-moving or lazy person or animal
Derived Forms
snail-like, adjective
Word Origin
Old English snægl; related to Old Norse snigill, Old High German snecko
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for snail
n.

Old English snægl, from Proto-Germanic *snagila (cf. Old Saxon snegil, Old Norse snigill, Danish snegl, Swedish snigel, Middle High German snegel, dialectal German Schnegel, Old High German snecko, German Schnecke "snail"), from *snog-, variant of PIE root *sneg- "to crawl, creep; creeping thing" (see snake (n.)). The word essentially is a diminutive form of Old English snaca "snake," which literally means "creeping thing." Also formerly used of slugs. Symbolic of slowness since at least c.1000; snail's pace is attested from c.1400.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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snail in the Bible

(1.) Heb. homit, among the unclean creeping things (Lev. 11:30). This was probably the sand-lizard, of which there are many species in the wilderness of Judea and the Sinai peninsula. (2.) Heb. shablul (Ps. 58:8), the snail or slug proper. Tristram explains the allusions of this passage by a reference to the heat and drought by which the moisture of the snail is evaporated. "We find," he says, "in all parts of the Holy Land myriads of snail-shells in fissures still adhering by the calcareous exudation round their orifice to the surface of the rock, but the animal of which is utterly shrivelled and wasted, 'melted away.'"

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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