snicker

[snik-er]
verb (used without object)
1.
to laugh in a half-suppressed, indecorous or disrespectful manner.
verb (used with object)
2.
to utter with a snicker.
noun
3.
a snickering laugh.
Also, snigger.


Origin:
1685–95; of expressive orig.

snickeringly, adverb

sneaker, snicker.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
snicker (ˈsnɪkə)
 
n
1.  chiefly (US), (Canadian) a sly or disrespectful laugh, esp one partly stifled
 
vb
2.  Equivalent term (in Britain and certain other countries): snigger to utter such a laugh
3.  (of a horse) to whinny
 
[C17: probably of imitative origin]

snigger or (US and Canadian) snicker (ˈsnɪɡə, ˈsnɪkə)
 
n
1.  a sly or disrespectful laugh, esp one partly stifled
 
vb
2.  to utter such a laugh
 
[C18: variant of snicker]
 
snicker or (US and Canadian) snicker
 
n
 
vb
 
[C18: variant of snicker]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

snicker
1694, possibly of imitative origin, similar to Du. snikken "to gasp, sob." The noun is first recorded 1836, from the verb.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Many a snicker greeted this blatant attempt to prefigure and even direct the
  course of artistic expression.
The youngsters in the room may even snicker derisively and wonder if anyone was
  ever daft enough to believe that.
They don't parrot the party line, they snicker at some official's sanitized
  version, they'll listen to their hosts' ideas.
People would snicker behind your back, your scientific career would be ruined,
  and you wouldn't get tenure.
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