snip

snip

[snip]
verb (used with object), snipped, snipping.
1.
to cut with a small, quick stroke, or a succession of such strokes, with scissors or the like.
2.
to remove or cut off (something) by or as by cutting in this manner: to snip a rose.
verb (used without object), snipped, snipping.
3.
to cut with small, quick strokes.
noun
4.
the act of snipping, as with scissors.
5.
a small cut made by snipping.
6.
a small piece snipped off.
7.
a small piece, bit, or amount of anything: a snip of food.
8.
Informal. a small or insignificant person.
9.
Informal. a presumptuous or impertinent person.
10.
snips, small, strong hand shears used by sheet metal workers.
11.
British Informal. a bargain.

Origin:
1550–60; origin uncertain; compare Dutch, Low German snippen to snip, catch, clip

unsnipped, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
snip (snɪp)
 
vb , snips, snipping, snipped
1.  to cut or clip with a small quick stroke or a succession of small quick strokes, esp with scissors or shears
 
n
2.  the act of snipping
3.  the sound of scissors or shears closing
4.  Also called: snipping a small piece of anything, esp one that has been snipped off
5.  a small cut made by snipping
6.  chiefly (Brit) an informal word for bargain
7.  informal something easily done; cinch
8.  informal (US), (Canadian) a small or insignificant person or thing, esp an irritating or insolent one
 
interj
9.  (often reiterated) a representation of the sound of scissors or shears closing
 
[C16: from Low German, Dutch snippen; related to Middle High German snipfen to snap the fingers]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

snip
1558, "small piece of cut-out cloth," probably from Du. or Low Ger. snippen "to snip, shred," of imitative origin. The verb is attested from 1586. Snippers "scissors" is from 1593. Snippy is 1727 with the meaning "parsimonious;" the sense of "fault-finding, sharp" is first recorded 1848. Snip-snap-snorum,
the card game, is 1755, from Low Ger.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Synonyms
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