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snood

[snood] /snud/
noun
1.
the distinctive headband formerly worn by young unmarried women in Scotland and northern England.
2.
a headband for the hair.
3.
a netlike hat or part of a hat or fabric that holds or covers the back of a woman's hair.
4.
the pendulous skin over the beak of a turkey.
verb (used with object)
5.
to bind or confine (the hair) with a snood.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English: fillet, ribbon; Old English snōd
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for snood
  • Beards must also be restrained with a beard snood or other means.
British Dictionary definitions for snood

snood

/snuːd/
noun
1.
a pouchlike hat, often of net, loosely holding a woman's hair at the back
2.
a headband, esp one formerly worn by young unmarried women in Scotland
3.
(vet science) a long fleshy appendage that hangs over the upper beak of turkeys
verb
4.
(transitive) to hold (the hair) in a snood
Word Origin
Old English snōd; of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for snood
snood
O.E. snod "ribbon for the hair," from P.Gmc. *snodo (cf. Swed. snod "string, cord"), from PIE base *(s)ne- "to spin, sew" (cf. Lett. snate "a linen cover," O.Ir. snathe "thread;" see needle). Meaning "net or bag worn over a woman's hair" first recorded 1938.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for snood

either of two types of hair ornament worn by women. The Scottish snood was a narrow circlet or ribbon fastened around the head and worn primarily by unmarried women, as a sign of chastity. During the Victorian era, hairnets worn for decoration were called snoods, and this term came to mean a netlike hat or part of a hat that caught the hair in the back. In the 1930s the name was given to a netlike bag worn at the back of a woman's head to hold the hair. During World War II snoods were immensely popular in factories, where they were worn to keep hair from being caught in machinery.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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6
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