soar

[sawr, sohr]
verb (used without object)
1.
to fly upward, as a bird.
2.
to fly at a great height, without visible movements of the pinions, as a bird.
3.
to glide along at a height, as an airplane.
4.
to rise or ascend to a height, as a mountain.
5.
to rise or aspire to a higher or more exalted level: His hopes soared.
noun
6.
an act or instance of soaring.
7.
the height attained in soaring.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English soren < Middle French essorer < Vulgar Latin *exaurāre, equivalent to Latin ex- ex-1 + aur(a) air + -āre infinitive suffix

soarer, noun
soaringly, adverb


1. See fly1. 4. tower; mount.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
soar (sɔː)
 
vb
1.  to rise or fly upwards into the air
2.  (of a bird, aircraft, etc) to glide while maintaining altitude by the use of ascending air currents
3.  to rise or increase in volume, size, etc: soaring prices
 
n
4.  the act of soaring
5.  the altitude attained by soaring
 
[C14: from Old French essorer, from Vulgar Latin exaurāre (unattested) to expose to the breezes, from Latin ex-1 + aura a breeze]
 
'soarer
 
n
 
'soaring
 
n, —adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

soar
late 14c., from O.Fr. essorer "fly up, soar," from V.L. *exaurare "rise into the air," from L. ex- "out" + aura "breeze, air."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

SOAR definition


1. State, Operator And Result. A general problem-solving production system architecture, intended as a model of human intelligence. Developed by A. Newell in the early 1980s. SOAR was originally implemented in Lisp and OPS5 and is currently implemented in Common Lisp. Version: Soar6.
E-mail: .
["The SOAR Papers", P.S. Rosenbloom et al eds, MIT Press 1993].
(1994-11-04)
2. Smalltalk On A RISC. A RISC microprocessor designed by David Patterson's at Berekeley.
(1994-11-04)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
As they soar in the nation's public life, their cherished text soars with them.
The same type of vortex also helps bats, hummingbirds and insects soar.
So physicists got to wondering whether radiation pressure could be harnessed to
  help an item soar.
Once computers achieve a level of intelligence comparable to that of humans,
  they will necessarily soar past it.
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