sodden

[sod-n]
adjective
1.
soaked with liquid or moisture; saturated.
2.
heavy, lumpy, or soggy, as food that is poorly cooked.
3.
having a soaked appearance.
4.
bloated, as the face.
5.
expressionless, dull, or stupid, especially from drunkenness.
6.
lacking spirit or alertness; inert; torpid; listless.
7.
Archaic. boiled.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
8.
to make or become sodden.
9.
Obsolete. past participle of seethe.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English soden, sothen, past participle of sethen to seethe

soddenly, adverb
soddenness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

seethe

[seeth]
verb (used without object), seethed or (Obsolete) sod; seethed or (Obsolete) sodden or sod; seething.
1.
to surge or foam as if boiling.
2.
to be in a state of agitation or excitement.
3.
Archaic. to boil.
verb (used with object), seethed or (Obsolete) sod; seethed or (Obsolete) sodden or sod; seething.
4.
to soak or steep.
5.
to cook by boiling or simmering; boil.
noun
6.
the act of seething.
7.
the state of being agitated or excited.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English sēothan; cognate with German sieden, Swedish sjuda

seethingly, adverb
unseethed, adjective
unseething, adjective


2. See boil1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
seethe (siːð)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to boil or to foam as if boiling
2.  (intr) to be in a state of extreme agitation, esp through anger
3.  (tr) to soak in liquid
4.  archaic (tr) to cook or extract the essence of (a food) by boiling
 
n
5.  the act or state of seething
 
[Old English sēothan; related to Old Norse sjōtha, Old High German siodan to seethe]

sodden (ˈsɒdən)
 
adj
1.  completely saturated
2.  a.  dulled, esp by excessive drinking
 b.  (in combination): a drink-sodden mind
3.  heavy or doughy, as bread is when improperly cooked
 
vb
4.  to make or become sodden
 
[C13 soden, past participle of seethe]
 
'soddenly
 
adv
 
'soddenness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

seethe
O.E. seoþan "to boil" (class II strong verb; past tense seaþ, pp. soden), from P.Gmc. *seuthanan (cf. O.N. sjoða, O.Fris. siatha, Du. zieden, O.H.G. siodan, Ger. sieden "to seethe"), from PIE base *seut- "to seethe, boil." Driven out of its literal meaning by
boil (v.); it survives largely in metaphoric extensions. Fig. use, of persons or populations, "to be in a state of inward agitation" is recorded from 1588 (implied in seething). It had wider fig. uses in O.E., e.g. "to try by fire, to afflict with cares." Now conjugated weak, and pp. sodden (q.v.) no longer felt as connected.

sodden
O.E. soden, strong pp. of seoþan "to cook, boil" (see seethe). Originally "boiled;" sense of "soaked" is first recorded 1820.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Seethe definition


to boil (Ex. 16:23).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Local cadres sitting on plastic chairs stoically endure the sodden spectacle.
Players' sodden shoes became as fuzzy as bedroom slippers.
Sodden areas near creeks and marshes are the best place to find amphibians.
Then canyon snowdrifts melted furiously into swollen streams and sodden ground.
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