solitude

[sol-i-tood, -tyood]
noun
1.
the state of being or living alone; seclusion: to enjoy one's solitude.
2.
remoteness from habitations, as of a place; absence of human activity: the solitude of the mountains.
3.
a lonely, unfrequented place: a solitude in the mountains.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Middle French < Latin sōlitūdō. See soli-1, -tude

solitudinous [sol-i-tood-n-uhs, -tyood-] , adjective


1. retirement, privacy. Solitude, isolation refer to a state of being or living alone. Solitude emphasizes the quality of being or feeling lonely and deserted: to live in solitude. Isolation may mean merely a detachment and separation from others: to be put in isolation with an infectious disease. 2. loneliness. 3. desert, wilderness.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
solitude (ˈsɒlɪˌtjuːd)
 
n
1.  the state of being solitary or secluded
2.  poetic a solitary place
 
[C14: from Latin sōlitūdō, from sōlus alone, sole1]
 
soli'tudinous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

solitude
late 14c., from O.Fr. solitude "loneliness," from L. solitudinem (nom. solitudo) "loneliness," from solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). "Not in common use in English until the 17th c." [OED]
"A man can be himself only so long as he is alone; ... if he does not love solitude, he will not love freedom; for it is only when he is alone that he is really free." [Schopenhauer, "The World as Will and Idea," 1818]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
One of the chief pleasures of a book is mental solitude, that deep, quiet focus
  on an author's thoughts-and your own.
She balances hours of solitude in flight against days of intense encounters
  with purveyors of ideas.
Books require a certain quiet, a solitude that is all the more valuable for the
  way it can be achieved in public.
The best bosses make time to be with their family, to think in solitude and to
  stay healthy.
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