sorghum

[sawr-guhm]
noun
1.
a cereal grass, Sorghum bicolor (or S. vulgare ), having broad, cornlike leaves and a tall, pithy stem bearing the grain in a dense terminal cluster.
2.
the syrup made from sorgo.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Neo-Latin < Italian sorgo (see sorgo)

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World English Dictionary
sorghum (ˈsɔːɡəm)
 
n
See also durra any grass of the Old World genus Sorghum, having solid stems, large flower heads, and glossy seeds: cultivated for grain, hay, and as a source of syrup
 
[C16: from New Latin, from Italian sorgo, probably from Vulgar Latin Syricum grānum (unattested) Syrian grain]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sorghum
1597, "Indian millet," from Mod.L. Sorghum, the genus name, from It. sorgo "a tall cereal grass," probably from M.L. surgum, suricum (12c.), perhaps a variant of L. syricum "Syrian," as in Syricum (gramen) "(grass) of Syria," from Syria, a possible source of the plant or its grain in ancient times.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
That's the conclusion of scientists who discovered evidence of the grain
  sorghum on hundred-thousand-year-old stone tools.
Millet, sorghum, wheat-the chaff cracked beneath my tires.
Distilled from sorghum, barley or rice, some also contain a preserved snake or
  scorpion floating inside.
They were crafted of sorghum stalks, light brown with dark flecks.
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