spited

spite

[spahyt]
noun
1.
a malicious, usually petty, desire to harm, annoy, frustrate, or humiliate another person; bitter ill will; malice.
2.
a particular instance of such an attitude or action; grudge.
3.
Obsolete. something that causes vexation; annoyance.
verb (used with object), spited, spiting.
4.
to treat with spite or malice.
5.
to annoy or thwart, out of spite.
6.
to fill with spite; vex; offend.
Idioms
7.
cut off one's nose to spite one's face. nose ( def 23 ).
8.
in spite of, in disregard or defiance of; notwithstanding; despite: She arrived at school on time in spite of the snowstorm.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English; aphetic variant of despite

spiteless, adjective
unspited, adjective


1. malevolence, maliciousness, rancor, venom, spleen. See grudge. 7. See notwithstanding.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
spite (spaɪt)
 
n
1.  maliciousness involving the desire to harm another; venomous ill will
2.  an instance of such malice; grudge
3.  archaic something that induces vexation
4.  (preposition) in spite of in defiance of; regardless of; notwithstanding
 
vb
5.  to annoy in order to vent spite
6.  archaic to offend
 
[C13: variant of despite]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

spite
c.1300, shortened form of despit "malice" (see despite). Corresponding to M.Du. spijt, M.L.G. spyt, M.Swed. spit. Commonly spelled spight c.1575-1700. The verb is attested from c.1400. Phrase in spite of is recorded from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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