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stand-up

or standup

[stand-uhp] /ˈstændˌʌp/
adjective
1.
standing erect or upright, as a collar.
2.
performed, taken, etc., while one stands:
a stand-up meal.
3.
designed for or requiring a standing position:
a stand-up lunch counter.
4.
(of a fight) characterized by the rapid exchange of many blows with little attention given to defensive maneuvering.
5.
characterized by an erect or bold stance:
a stand-up batter who hits many doubles.
6.
Baseball. (of a double or triple) pertaining to a hit that allows the hitter to reach the base safely without having to slide.
7.
(of a comedian) delivering a comic monologue while alone on the stage.
Origin of stand-up
1580-1590
1580-90; adj. use of verb phrase stand up
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for stand-up
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • “I thought you said they had a stand-up dinner at the table,” said Philo Gubb.

  • There were ladies in coats and stand-up collars, and gentlemen with ringlets.

    All Roads Lead to Calvary Jerome K. Jerome
  • In more than one stand-up fight he had demonstrated his right to the title of champion of the county.

    The Graysons Edward Eggleston
  • This will do away with the stand-up look that sleeves sometimes have.

    Textiles and Clothing Kate Heintz Watson
  • He had a stand-up collar and a cut-away coat with gilt buttons and a Scotch cap.

    Animal Ghosts Elliott O'Donnell
Contemporary definitions for stand-up
noun
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Word Origin and History for stand-up
adj.

"courageous," 1811, originally of fist fights. To stand (someone) up "fail to keep an appointment" is attested from 1902. Stand-up comic first attested 1966.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for stand-up

stand the gaff

verb phrase

To persist and endure against rigors; take it: I've had at least seven lifetimes on Seventh Avenue, mainly because I've learned to stand the gaff

[1896+; fr gaff, the steel spur attached to the leg of a fighting cock]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Difficulty index for stand-up

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for stand

6
7
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