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stat1

[stat] /stæt/
noun
1.
Also, 'stat. thermostat.
2.
Origin
1955-1960
1955-60; by shortening

stat2

[stat] /stæt/
noun
1.
2.
Usually, stats. statistics.
adjective
3.
of, pertaining to, or containing statistics:
Some sports fans memorize all the stat sheets published about a team.
Origin
shortening of statistics, statistic

stat3

[stat] /stæt/
adverb, Medicine/Medical Informal.
1.
immediately.
Origin
< Latin statim

-stat

1.
a combining form used in the names of devices that stabilize or make constant what is specified by the initial element:
thermostat; rheostat.
Origin
< Greek -statēs, equivalent to sta- (stem of histánai to make stand; see stand) + -tēs agent noun suffix

stat.1

1.
(in prescriptions) immediately.
Origin
< Latin statim

stat.2

1.
2.
3.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for stat
  • stat-up costs are high but in the long run the savings more than pay for the investment.
  • However, the observation he makes as a result of this stat is completely speculation.
  • Critics, meanwhile, worry that these stat-happy quants take the human out of the humanities.
  • And fantasy baseball fanatics can track their players with stat-filled player cards.
  • Problem is, to calculate that stat, economists remove stores that have closed from their sample.
  • It's important for readers to know how development works so good for posting that stat.
  • However, it wasn't my lit but my stat prof who said the plural of anecdote is not synonymous to data.
  • The fact that two systems with oppositely-pointed arrows of time would interfere with each other follows from basic stat mech.
  • Emma blows her stack again, which makes me fear it will become a stack schtick, stat.
  • Let's stat with finder it should list folder first then files.
British Dictionary definitions for stat

stat.

abbreviation
1.
(in prescriptions) immediately
2.
stationary
3.
statute
Word Origin
(sense 1) from Latin statim

-stat

combining form
1.
indicating a device that causes something to remain stationary or constant: thermostat
Word Origin
from Greek -statēs, from histanai to cause to stand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for stat
n.

"instrument that keeps something stationary," before 1970, shortened form of Latin statim (adv.), originally "to a standstill," from status (see state (n.1)).

-stat

combining form used in forming the names of devices for stabilizing or regulating (thermostat, etc.), from Greek statos "standing, stationary," from histanai "to cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet). First used in heliostat "an instrument for causing the sun to appear stationary" (1742).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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stat in Medicine

stat (stāt)
adv.
With no delay. adj.
Immediate.

-stat suff.

  1. Something that stabilizes: barostat.

  2. Something that inhibits: hemostat.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Related Abbreviations for stat

stat

  1. from Latin statim (immediately)
  2. statistics

STAT

stratospheric tracers of atmospheric transport

stat.

  1. statistic
  2. statistics
  3. statuary
  4. statute

Stat.

United States Statutes at Large
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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