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steamer

[stee-mer] /ˈsti mər/
noun
1.
something propelled or operated by steam, as a steamship.
2.
a person or thing that steams.
3.
a device, pot, or container in which something is steamed.
verb (used without object)
5.
to travel by steamship.
Origin
1805-1815
1805-15; steam + -er1

steam

[steem] /stim/
noun
1.
water in the form of an invisible gas or vapor.
2.
water changed to this form by boiling, extensively used for the generation of mechanical power, for heating purposes, etc.
3.
the mist formed when the gas or vapor from boiling water condenses in the air.
4.
an exhalation of a vapor or mist.
5.
Informal. power or energy.
verb (used without object)
6.
to emit or give off steam or vapor.
7.
to rise or pass off in the form of steam or vapor.
8.
to become covered with condensed steam, as a window or other surface (often followed by up).
9.
to generate or produce steam, as in a boiler.
10.
to move or travel by the agency of steam.
11.
to move rapidly or evenly:
He steamed out of the room.
12.
Informal. to be angry or show anger:
Fans are still steaming from Monday night’s sloppy 5-4 loss.
verb (used with object)
13.
to expose to or treat with steam, as in order to heat, cook, soften, renovate, or the like.
14.
to emit or exhale (steam or vapor).
15.
Informal. to cause to become irked or angry (often followed by up).
16.
to convey by the agency of steam:
to steam the ship safely into port.
adjective
17.
heated by or heating with steam:
a steam radiator.
18.
propelled by or propelling with a steam engine.
19.
operated by steam.
20.
conducting steam:
a steam line.
21.
bathed with or affected by steam.
22.
of or pertaining to steam.
Idioms
23.
blow / let off steam, Informal. to give vent to one's repressed emotions, especially by talking or behaving in an unrestrained manner:
Don't take her remarks too seriously—she was just blowing off steam.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English steme, Old English stēam; cognate with Dutch stoom
Related forms
steamless, adjective
outsteam, verb (used with object)
presteam, adjective, verb (used with object)
unsteamed, adjective
unsteaming, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for steamer
  • If you have a facial steamer, you can use it with a drop or two of peppermint oil or eucalyptus oil.
  • He was toiling along with short oars, and the dory tossed and sank and tossed again with the steamer's waves.
  • Arrange on a tin plate covered with cheesecloth, fold cheesecloth over fillets, and cook in steamer fifteen minutes.
  • The ordinary fibre trunk is good for rail and steamer travel, but it is absolutely unpractical for mule-back or canoe.
  • It's kind of a cross between a rice steamer and a bread maker, and apparently you can fit one under your desk.
  • Typically, they traveled by luxury steamer and coach, with servants and trunks in tow.
  • Silas sleeps in a steamer trunk with dirt in the bottom and doesn't cast a reflection.
  • Also called a steamer sturgeon: noun: type of marine or freshwater large, long, bony fish.
  • At one time, cruising was restricted solely to the wealthy, who often carried steamer trunks filled with formal attire.
  • Tourists have the option of traveling by bus, airplane, train or steamer.
British Dictionary definitions for steamer

steamer

/ˈstiːmə/
noun
1.
a boat or ship driven by steam engines
2.
Also called steam box. an apparatus for steaming wooden beams and planks to make them pliable for shipbuilding
3.
a vessel used to cook food by steam
4.
(Austral, slang) a clash of sporting teams characterized by rough play

steam

/stiːm/
noun
1.
the gas or vapour into which water is changed when boiled
2.
the mist formed when such gas or vapour condenses in the atmosphere
3.
any vaporous exhalation
4.
(informal) power, energy, or speed
5.
get up steam
  1. (of a ship, etc) to work up a sufficient head of steam in a boiler to drive an engine
  2. (informal) to go quickly
6.
(informal) let off steam, to release pent-up energy or emotions
7.
under one's own steam, without the assistance of others
8.
(Austral, slang) cheap wine
9.
(modifier) driven, operated, heated, powered, etc, by steam: a steam radiator
10.
(modifier) treated by steam: steam ironed, steam cleaning
11.
(modifier) (jocular) old-fashioned; outmoded: steam radio
verb
12.
to emit or be emitted as steam
13.
(intransitive) to generate steam, as a boiler, etc
14.
(intransitive) to move or travel by steam power, as a ship, etc
15.
(intransitive) (informal) to proceed quickly and sometimes forcefully
16.
to cook or be cooked in steam
17.
(transitive) to treat with steam or apply steam to, as in cleaning, pressing clothes, etc
See also steam up
Word Origin
Old English; related to Dutch stoom steam, perhaps to Old High German stioban to raise dust, Gothic stubjus dust
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for steamer
n.

1814 in the cookery sense, agent noun from steam (v.). From 1825 as "a vessel propelled by steam," hence steamer trunk (1885), one that carries the essentials for a voyage.

steam

n.

Old English steam "vapor, fume," from Proto-Germanic *staumaz (cf. Dutch stoom), of unknown origin. Steam age first attested 1941. Steam heat as a method of temperature control recorded from 1904.

v.

Old English stemen, stymen "to emit a scent or odor," from the root of steam (n.). Slang meaning "to make angry" is from 1922. Related: Steamed; steaming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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steamer in Science
steam
  (stēm)   
  1. Water in its gaseous state, especially at a temperature above the boiling point of water (above 100°C, or 212°F, at sea level). See Note at vapor.

  2. A mist of condensed water vapor.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for steamer

steam

verb
  1. To anger; make furious: I steam easily/ It steams me to hear that our fair burg is the Crime Capital of the World (1922+)
  2. To make someone hotly amorous: Be thrilled by, chilled by, and steamed by Gilbert and Garbo (1970s+)
Related Terms

let off steam


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with steamer
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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