stimulate

[stim-yuh-leyt]
verb (used with object), stimulated, stimulating.
1.
to rouse to action or effort, as by encouragement or pressure; spur on; incite: to stimulate his interest in mathematics.
2.
Physiology, Medicine/Medical. to excite (a nerve, gland, etc.) to its functional activity.
3.
to invigorate (a person) by a food or beverage containing a stimulant, as coffee, tea, or alcoholic liquor.
verb (used without object), stimulated, stimulating.
4.
to act as a stimulus or stimulant.

Origin:
1540–50; < Latin stimulātus (past participle of stimulāre to goad). See stimulus, -ate1

stimulable, adjective
stimulability [stim-yuh-luh-bil-i-tee] , noun
stimulatingly, adverb
stimulation, noun
stimulator, stimulater, noun
antistimulation, noun
hyperstimulation, noun
interstimulate, verb (used with object), interstimulated, interstimulating.
interstimulation, noun
nonstimulable, adjective
nonstimulating, adjective
nonstimulation, noun
overstimulate, verb, overstimulated, overstimulating.
overstimulation, noun
poststimulation, adjective
prestimulate, verb (used with object), prestimulated, prestimulating.
prestimulation, noun
restimulate, verb (used with object), restimulated, restimulating.
restimulation, noun
self-stimulated, adjective
self-stimulating, adjective
self-stimulation, noun
semistimulating, adjective
superstimulate, verb (used with object), superstimulated, superstimulating.
superstimulation, noun
unstimulable, adjective
unstimulated, adjective
unstimulating, adjective
unstimulatingly, adverb

activate, actuate, stimulate.


1. arouse, activate, excite. See animate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
stimulate (ˈstɪmjʊˌleɪt)
 
vb
1.  (tr; usually passive) to fill (a person) with ideas or enthusiasm: he was stimulated by the challenge
2.  (tr) physiol to excite (a nerve, organ, etc) with a stimulus
3.  to encourage (something) to start or progress further: a cut in interest rates should help stimulate economic recovery
 
[C16: from Latin stimulāre; see stimulant]
 
'stimulable
 
adj
 
stimu'lation
 
n
 
'stimulative
 
adj, —n
 
'stimulator
 
n
 
'stimulater
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

stimulation
1520s, "act of pricking or stirring to action," from L. stimulationem (nom. stimulatio), from stimulare "prick, goad, urge," from stimulus "spur, goad," from PIE *sti- "point, prick, pierce" (see stick (v.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

stimulate stim·u·late (stĭm'yə-lāt')
v. stim·u·lat·ed, stim·u·lat·ing, stim·u·lates
To arouse a body or a responsive structure to increased functional activity.


stim'u·lat'er n.

stimulation stim·u·la·tion (stĭm'yə-lā'shən)
n.

  1. Arousal of the body or of individual organs or other parts to increased functional activity.

  2. The condition of being stimulated.

  3. The application of a stimulus to a responsive structure, such as a nerve or muscle, regardless of whether the strength of the stimulus is sufficient to produce excitation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
It will give you the intellectual stimulation and challenge that you need.
These cells release serotonin into the limbic system in response to
  sensory-nerve stimulation.
The secretin stimulation test measures the ability of the pancreas to respond
  to a hormone called secretin.
There are lots of other places you could find the kind of intellectual
  stimulation you crave.
Synonyms
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