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stoop1

[stoop] /stup/
verb (used without object)
1.
to bend the head and shoulders, or the body generally, forward and downward from an erect position:
to stoop over a desk.
2.
to carry the head and shoulders habitually bowed forward:
to stoop from age.
3.
(of trees, precipices, etc.) to bend, bow, or lean.
4.
to descend from one's level of dignity; condescend; deign:
Don't stoop to argue with him.
5.
to swoop down, as a hawk at prey.
6.
to submit; yield.
7.
Obsolete. to come down from a height.
verb (used with object)
8.
to bend (oneself, one's head, etc.) forward and downward.
9.
Archaic. to abase, humble, or subdue.
noun
10.
the act or an instance of stooping.
11.
a stooping position or carriage of body:
The elderly man walked with a stoop.
12.
a descent from dignity or superiority.
13.
a downward swoop, as of a hawk.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English stoupen (v.), Old English stūpian; cognate with Middle Dutch stūpen to bend, bow; akin to steep1
Related forms
stooper, noun
stoopingly, adverb
nonstooping, adjective
unstooped, adjective
unstooping, adjective
Synonyms
1. lean, crouch. See bend1 .

stoop2

[stoop] /stup/
noun
1.
a small raised platform, approached by steps and sometimes having a roof and seats, at the entrance of a house; a small porch.
Origin
1670-80, Americanism; < Dutch stoep; cognate with Middle Low German stōpe, German Stufe step in a stair. See step

stoop3

[stoop] /stup/
noun
1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for stoop
  • Literally dozens of rats swarming between the building and behind the stoop.
  • To be fair, that's a long time to stoop and pick up a penny.
  • But they will never stop trying to convert the world if they have to stoop to politics to do it.
  • They had to protect their wearer from the tough terrain and provide the ability to stoop down and collect rocks.
  • Another is that some politicians are tempted to stoop to crude populism, including the stoking of communal tensions.
  • If you aren't sure if your home is bolted to its foundation, crawl, stoop or walk under your home and take a peek.
  • Going upstream from there, you stoop and crawl toward a waterfall.
  • They want the tech, but in reality they would likely stoop to terrorism by smuggling a nuke though a porous border or coastline.
  • My guess would be that they will simply stoop and give in to their demands.
  • They must not stoop low to safeguard their strategic position in other ways.
British Dictionary definitions for stoop

stoop1

/stuːp/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
(also transitive) to bend (the body or the top half of the body) forward and downward
2.
to carry oneself with head and shoulders habitually bent forward
3.
(often foll by to) to abase or degrade oneself
4.
(often foll by to) to condescend; deign
5.
(of a bird of prey) to swoop down
6.
(archaic) to give in
noun
7.
the act, position, or characteristic of stooping
8.
a lowering from a position of dignity or superiority
9.
a downward swoop, esp of a bird of prey
Derived Forms
stooper, noun
stooping, adjective
stoopingly, adverb
Word Origin
Old English stūpan; related to Middle Dutch stupen to bow, Old Norse stūpa, Norwegian stupa to fall; see steep1

stoop2

/stuːp/
noun
1.
(US & Canadian) a small platform with steps up to it at the entrance to a building
Word Origin
C18: from Dutch stoep, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German stuofa stair, Old English stōpel footprint; see step

stoop3

/stuːp/
noun
1.
(archaic) a pillar or post
Word Origin
C15: variant of dialect stulpe, probably from Old Norse stolpe; see stele

stoop4

/stuːp/
noun
1.
a less common spelling of stoup

stoup

/stuːp/
noun
1.
a small basin for holy water
2.
(Scot & Northern English, dialect) Also stowp. a bucket or drinking vessel
Word Origin
C14 (in the sense: bucket): of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse staup beaker, Old English stēap flagon; see steep1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for stoop
v.

"bend forward," Old English stupian "to bow, bend" (cognate with Middle Dutch stupen "to bow, bend"), from Proto-Germanic *stup-, from PIE *(s)teu- (see steep (adj.)). Figurative sense of "condescend" is from 1570s. Sense of "swoop" is first recorded 1570s in falconry.

n.

"raised open platform at the door of a house," 1755, American and Canadian, from Dutch stoep "flight of steps, doorstep, stoop," from Middle Dutch, from Proto-Germanic *stopo "step" (see step).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for stoop

stoop

Related Terms

stupe


stupe

noun

A stupid person: ''Don't call me stupe,'' Humphrey said/ Surprised that we're not total stupes? (1762+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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