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stoop1

[stoop] /stup/
verb (used without object)
1.
to bend the head and shoulders, or the body generally, forward and downward from an erect position:
to stoop over a desk.
2.
to carry the head and shoulders habitually bowed forward:
to stoop from age.
3.
(of trees, precipices, etc.) to bend, bow, or lean.
4.
to descend from one's level of dignity; condescend; deign:
Don't stoop to argue with him.
5.
to swoop down, as a hawk at prey.
6.
to submit; yield.
7.
Obsolete. to come down from a height.
verb (used with object)
8.
to bend (oneself, one's head, etc.) forward and downward.
9.
Archaic. to abase, humble, or subdue.
noun
10.
the act or an instance of stooping.
11.
a stooping position or carriage of body:
The elderly man walked with a stoop.
12.
a descent from dignity or superiority.
13.
a downward swoop, as of a hawk.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English stoupen (v.), Old English stūpian; cognate with Middle Dutch stūpen to bend, bow; akin to steep1
Related forms
stooper, noun
stoopingly, adverb
nonstooping, adjective
unstooped, adjective
unstooping, adjective
Synonyms
1. lean, crouch. See bend1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for stooping
  • Climbing up on things or stooping down to get a better shot is a lot harder to do in floor-length skirt.
  • stooping down theatrically, he plunges his protected hands wrist-deep into the soft surface.
  • He holds his head forward and his shoulders are bent from almost forty years of stooping over his instruments.
  • The dead lift is a weight-lifting exercise that's performed by stooping and then lifting a weight from the floor to hip level.
  • But she is stooping so low that she rakes the mud she has trampled up and tries to fling it.
  • It is a great face-people stop in the street and stare at the tall stooping but powerfully built figure.
  • Imagine a kitchen where you could limit the bending, stooping and awkward reaching for pots, pans and cleaning products.
  • One part seemingly a false idol, stooping to the ethical common denominator of his sport.
  • Decorating with a furry companion in mind means stooping to the animal's level.
  • The treacherous queen caused a servant to stab him in the belly whilst he was stooping out of courtesy, after drinking.
British Dictionary definitions for stooping

stoop1

/stuːp/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
(also transitive) to bend (the body or the top half of the body) forward and downward
2.
to carry oneself with head and shoulders habitually bent forward
3.
(often foll by to) to abase or degrade oneself
4.
(often foll by to) to condescend; deign
5.
(of a bird of prey) to swoop down
6.
(archaic) to give in
noun
7.
the act, position, or characteristic of stooping
8.
a lowering from a position of dignity or superiority
9.
a downward swoop, esp of a bird of prey
Derived Forms
stooper, noun
stooping, adjective
stoopingly, adverb
Word Origin
Old English stūpan; related to Middle Dutch stupen to bow, Old Norse stūpa, Norwegian stupa to fall; see steep1

stoop2

/stuːp/
noun
1.
(US & Canadian) a small platform with steps up to it at the entrance to a building
Word Origin
C18: from Dutch stoep, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German stuofa stair, Old English stōpel footprint; see step

stoop3

/stuːp/
noun
1.
(archaic) a pillar or post
Word Origin
C15: variant of dialect stulpe, probably from Old Norse stolpe; see stele

stoop4

/stuːp/
noun
1.
a less common spelling of stoup
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for stooping

stoop

v.

"bend forward," Old English stupian "to bow, bend" (cognate with Middle Dutch stupen "to bow, bend"), from Proto-Germanic *stup-, from PIE *(s)teu- (see steep (adj.)). Figurative sense of "condescend" is from 1570s. Sense of "swoop" is first recorded 1570s in falconry.

n.

"raised open platform at the door of a house," 1755, American and Canadian, from Dutch stoep "flight of steps, doorstep, stoop," from Middle Dutch, from Proto-Germanic *stopo "step" (see step).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for stooping

stoop

Related Terms

stupe


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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11
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