follow Dictionary.com

Is Tuesday named for a one-handed god?

strand1

[strand] /strænd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to drive or leave (a ship, fish, etc.) aground or ashore:
The receding tide stranded the whale.
2.
(usually used in the passive) to bring into or leave in a helpless position:
He was stranded in the middle of nowhere.
verb (used without object)
3.
to be driven or left ashore; run aground.
4.
to be halted or struck by a difficult situation:
He stranded in the middle of his speech.
noun
5.
the land bordering the sea, a lake, or a river; shore; beach.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English (noun), Old English; cognate with Dutch strand, German Strand, Old Norse strǫnd; akin to strew

strand2

[strand] /strænd/
noun
1.
one of a number of fibers, threads, or yarns that are plaited or twisted together to form a rope, cord, or the like.
2.
a similar part of a wire rope.
3.
a rope made of such twisted or plaited fibers.
4.
a fiber or filament, as in animal or plant tissue.
5.
a thread or threadlike part of anything:
the strands of a plot.
6.
a tress of hair.
7.
a string of pearls, beads, etc.
verb (used with object)
8.
to form (a rope, cable, etc.) by twisting strands together.
9.
to break one or more strands of (a rope).
Origin
1490-1500; origin uncertain
Related forms
strandless, adjective

Strand

[strand] /strænd/
noun
1.
Mark, born 1934, U.S. poet, born in Canada: U.S. poet laureate 1990–91.
2.
Paul, 1890–1976, U.S. photographer and documentary-film producer.
3.
the, a street parallel to the Thames, in W central London, England: famous for hotels and theaters.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for strand
  • With no decision on a leader, voters struggle to detect which strand of the party predominates.
  • Some sutures consist of a single strand of material that moves easily through tissue.
  • By day, this garland is a rustic-looking, handsome strand that celebrates the harvest.
  • In case you haven't noticed, this site is currently being bombarded by a certain strand of conspiracy theorist.
  • The third strand is the uselessness of the government.
  • Finally, if you're really serious about the carpet, tug off a strand or two of the pile and burn it.
  • The copied fragments are then sorted by size to determine the sequence of the original strand.
  • Slurping the spaghetti strand into your mouth applies kinetic energy.
  • In others, a single strand is sponsored by the state.
  • It is illiquid, which can strand people in their homes even if they are not in negative equity.
British Dictionary definitions for strand

strand1

/strænd/
verb
1.
to leave or drive (ships, fish, etc) aground or ashore or (of ships, fish, etc) to be left or driven ashore
2.
(transitive; usually passive) to leave helpless, as without transport or money, etc
noun (mainly poetic)
3.
a shore or beach
4.
a foreign country
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse strönd side, Middle High German strant beach, Latin sternere to spread

strand2

/strænd/
noun
1.
a set of or one of the individual fibres or threads of string, wire, etc, that form a rope, cable, etc
2.
a single length of string, hair, wool, wire, etc
3.
a string of pearls or beads
4.
a constituent element in a complex whole: one strand of her argument
verb
5.
(transitive) to form (a rope, cable, etc) by winding strands together
Word Origin
C15: of uncertain origin

Strand

/strænd/
noun
1.
the Strand, a street in W central London, parallel to the Thames: famous for its hotels and theatres
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for strand
n.

"shore," Old English strand, from Proto-Germanic *strandas (cf. Danish and Swedish strand "beach, shore, strand," Old Norse strönd "border, edge, shore," Middle Low German strant, German Strand, Dutch strand "beach"), perhaps from PIE root *ster- "to stretch out." Strictly, the part of a shore that lies between the tide-marks. Formerly also used of river banks, hence the London street name (1246).

"fiber of a rope, string, etc.," late 15c., probably from Old French estran, from a Germanic source akin to Old High German streno "lock, tress, strand of hair," Middle Dutch strene, German Strähne "skein, strand," of unknown origin.

v.

1620s, "to drive aground on a shore," from strand (n.1); figurative sense of "leave helpless" is first recorded 1837. Related: Stranded; stranding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
strand in Technology

1. AND-parallel logic programming language. Essentially flat Parlog83 with sequential-and and sequential-or eliminated.
["Strand: New Concepts on Parallel Programming", Ian Foster et al, P-H 1990]. Strand88 is a commercial implementation.
2. A query language, implemented on top of INGRES (an RDBMS). ["Modelling Summary Data", R. Johnson, Proc ACM SIGMOD Conf 1981].
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for strand

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for strand

7
8
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with strand