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strange

[streynj] /streɪndʒ/
adjective, stranger, strangest.
1.
unusual, extraordinary, or curious; odd; queer:
a strange remark to make.
2.
estranged, alienated, etc., as a result of being out of one's natural environment:
In Bombay I felt strange.
3.
situated, belonging, or coming from outside of one's own locality; foreign:
to move to a strange place; strange religions.
4.
outside of one's previous experience; hitherto unknown; unfamiliar:
strange faces; strange customs.
5.
unaccustomed to or inexperienced in; unacquainted (usually followed by to):
I'm strange to this part of the job.
6.
distant or reserved; shy.
adverb
7.
in a strange manner.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English < Old French estrange < Latin extrāneus; see extraneous
Related forms
strangely, adverb
unstrange, adjective
unstrangely, adverb
unstrangeness, noun
Synonyms
1. bizarre, singular, abnormal, anomalous. Strange, peculiar, odd, queer refer to that which is out of the ordinary. Strange implies that the thing or its cause is unknown or unexplained; it is unfamiliar and unusual: a strange expression. That which is peculiar mystifies, or exhibits qualities not shared by others: peculiar behavior. That which is odd is irregular or unconventional, and sometimes approaches the bizarre: an odd custom. Queer sometimes adds to odd the suggestion of something abnormal and eccentric: queer in the head. 6. aloof.
Antonyms
4–6. familiar.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for strangely
  • These strangely beautiful devices are monuments to humankind's resolve to learn about the universe.
  • strangely, though, traces of this kind of feeding behavior are rare.
  • strangely, one of the early paintings arguably became more famous than the actual mural itself.
  • strangely, though, the dinosaurs of last book are not drawn in as much detail.
  • Her legs start to feel numb, and her jeans turn strangely stiff.
  • strangely, however, observations of the star clumps indicate that they instead fall into two distinct types.
  • Signs of writing were strangely lacking, however, except for some controversial claims based on limited imagery.
  • Generally he does not react strangely to any other sounds.
  • Thus, the article strikes me as strangely biased, even if the results of the original study are not sufficiently substantiated.
  • strangely, her fainting episodes coincided with eating sandwiches and drinking fizzy beverages.
British Dictionary definitions for strangely

strange

/streɪndʒ/
adjective
1.
odd, unusual, or extraordinary in appearance, effect, manner, etc; peculiar
2.
not known, seen, or experienced before; unfamiliar a strange land
3.
not easily explained a strange phenomenon
4.
(usually foll by to) inexperienced (in) or unaccustomed (to) strange to a task
5.
not of one's own kind, locality, etc; alien; foreign
6.
shy; distant; reserved
7.
strange to say, it is unusual or surprising that
8.
(physics)
  1. denoting a particular flavour of quark
  2. denoting or relating to a hypothetical form of matter composed of such quarks strange matter, a strange star
adverb
9.
(not standard) in a strange manner
Derived Forms
strangely, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French estrange, from Latin extrāneus foreign; see extraneous
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for strangely

strange

adj.

late 13c., "from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar," from Old French estrange (French étrange) "foreign, alien," from Latin extraneus "foreign, external," from extra "outside of" (see extra). Sense of "queer, surprising" is attested from late 14c. Stranger, attested from late 14c., never picked up the secondary sense of the adjective. As a form of address to an unknown person, it is recorded from 1817, American English rural colloquial. Meaning "one who has stopped visiting" is recorded from 1520s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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