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strangle

[strang-guh l] /ˈstræŋ gəl/
verb (used with object), strangled, strangling.
1.
to kill by squeezing the throat in order to compress the windpipe and prevent the intake of air, as with the hands or a tightly drawn cord.
2.
to kill by stopping the breath in any manner; choke; stifle; suffocate.
3.
to prevent the continuance, growth, rise, or action of; suppress:
Censorship strangles a free press.
verb (used without object), strangled, strangling.
4.
to be choked, stifled, or suffocated.
Origin of strangle
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English strangelen < Old French estrangler < Latin strangulāre < Greek strangalân, derivative of strangálē halter, akin to strangós twisted
Related forms
strangler, noun
stranglingly, adverb
unstrangled, adjective
Synonyms
1. garrote, throttle, choke. 2. smother. 3. check, repress, gag, muzzle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for strangle
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It was his constant boast that he never marked out a victim whom he did not strangle with his own hands.

    Confessions of a Thug Philip Meadows Taylor
  • Can he compass his spirit with meekness, and strangle a natural oath?

    Farm Ballads Will Carleton
  • Alcide Jolivet would have liked to strangle the honorable correspondent of the Daily Telegraph.

    Michael Strogoff Jules Verne
  • Also the camel-goose might fling his neck about the villain, and strangle him.

  • Thus, in order to strangle concerns that compete with them successfully, the average German merchant sticks at nothing.

    England and Germany Emile Joseph Dillon
British Dictionary definitions for strangle

strangle

/ˈstræŋɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to kill by compressing the windpipe; throttle
2.
(transitive) to prevent or inhibit the growth or development of: to strangle originality
3.
(transitive) to suppress (an utterance) by or as if by swallowing suddenly: to strangle a cry
See also strangles
Word Origin
C13: via Old French, ultimately from Greek strangalē a halter
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for strangle
v.

c.1300, from Old French estrangler, from Latin strangulare "to choke, stifle, check, constrain," from Greek strangalan "choke, twist," from strangale "a halter, cord, lace," related to strangos "twisted," from PIE root *strenk- "tight, narrow; pull tight, twist" (see strain (v.)). Related: Strangled; strangling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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strangle in Medicine

strangle stran·gle (strāng'gəl)
v. stran·gled, stran·gling, stran·gles
To compress the trachea so as to prevent sufficient passage of air; suffocate.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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