suasive

suasion

[swey-zhuhn]
noun
1.
the act of advising, urging, or attempting to persuade; persuasion.
2.
an instance of this; a persuasive effort.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Latin suāsiōn- (stem of suāsiō), equivalent to suās(us), past participle of suādēre to advise (suād-, verb stem + -tus past participle suffix, with dt > s) + -iōn- -ion

suasive [swey-siv] , suasory [swey-suh-ree] , adjective
suasively, adverb
suasiveness, noun
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World English Dictionary
suasion (ˈsweɪʒən)
 
n
a rare word for persuasion
 
[C14: from Latin suāsiō, from suādēre to persuade]
 
'suasive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

suasion
late 14c., probably via O.Fr. suasion (14c.), from L. suasionem (nom. suasio) "an advising, a counseling," from suasus, pp. of suadere "to urge, persuade" (related to suavis "sweet;" see sweet). Survives chiefly in phrase moral suasion (1640s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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