subsume

[suhb-soom]
verb (used with object), subsumed, subsuming.
1.
to consider or include (an idea, term, proposition, etc.) as part of a more comprehensive one.
2.
to bring (a case, instance, etc.) under a rule.
3.
to take up into a more inclusive classification.

Origin:
1525–35; < Medieval Latin subsūmere, equivalent to Latin sub- sub- + sūmere to take; see consume

subsumable, adjective
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World English Dictionary
subsume (səbˈsjuːm)
 
vb
1.  to incorporate (an idea, proposition, case, etc) under a comprehensive or inclusive classification or heading
2.  to consider (an instance of something) as part of a general rule or principle
 
[C16: from New Latin subsumere, from Latin sub- + sumere to take]
 
sub'sumable
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

subsume
1530s, from Mod.L. subsumere "to take under," from L. sub "under" + sumere "to take."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He has technique to burn, but he also has a chameleonlike ability to subsume
  himself in the music.
Games have the potential to subsume almost all other forms of entertainment
  media.
He could subsume anything to his phrasing, with his rhythmic hesitations,
  elisions of words and sudden swells.
Data networks will subsume voice networks, but the ghosts of telecom will live
  on in the underlying, invisible technology.
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