suckle

[suhk-uhl]
verb (used with object), suckled, suckling.
1.
to nurse at the breast or udder.
2.
to nourish or bring up.
3.
to put to suck.
verb (used without object), suckled, suckling.
4.
to suck at the breast or udder.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English sucklen; see suck, -le

unsuckled, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
suckle (ˈsʌkəl)
 
vb
1.  to give (a baby or young animal) milk from the breast or (of a baby, etc) to suck milk from the breast
2.  (tr) to bring up; nurture
 
[C15: probably back formation from suckling]
 
'suckler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

suckle
1408, perhaps a causative form of M.E. suken "to suck" (see suck), or a back-formation from suckling (though this word is attested only from c.1440).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
When they nurse they suckle desperately, thrusting out their tongue.
After the first week, mothers hunt for fish by day and suckle their pups by
  night.
Others suckle your scalp to extract your bodily fluids for sustenance.
The pups-who depend on her milk for six months-can now suckle again.
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