suction

[suhk-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act, process, or condition of sucking.
2.
the force that, by a pressure differential, attracts a substance or object to the region of lower pressure.
3.
the act or process of producing such a force.
verb (used with object)
4.
to draw out or remove by aspiration.

Origin:
1605–15; < Late Latin sūctiōn- (stem of sūctiō) a sucking, equivalent to Latin sūct(us) (past participle of sūgere to suck) + -iōn- -ion

suctional, adjective
nonsuction, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
suction (ˈsʌkʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or process of sucking
2.  the force or condition produced by a pressure difference, as the force holding a suction cap onto a surface
3.  the act or process of producing such a force or condition
 
[C17: from Late Latin suctiō a sucking, from Latin sūgere to suck]
 
'suctional
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

suction
1626, from L.L. suctionem (nom. suctio), noun of action from L. suctus, pp. of sugere "to suck" (see suck).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
suction   (sŭk'shən)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. A force acting on a fluid caused by difference in pressure between two regions, tending to make the fluid flow from the region of higher pressure to the region of lower pressure.

  2. The act of reducing pressure to create such a force, as by the use of a pump or fan.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

suck definition


  1. n.
    and suction. liquor; wine; beer; strong drink. : How about a little glass of suck before we leave?
  2. tv.
    and suck. sth up to drink beer or liquor. : Yeah, I'll suck one up with ya.
  3. in.
    [for someone or something] to be bad or undesirable. : This movie sucks!
  4. n.
    and suction. influence. : He thinks he has suck, but he's just a pain in the neck.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Example sentences
Many of them could resist the suction of even our industrial-strength vacuum
  cleaner.
Each is fitted with a roof for shade, a large motor on deck and a huge suction
  pipe running from the stern into the water.
Thanks guys, you have made the comments suction as interesting as the article
  itself.
But if you want to suck up, don't apply suction to lower-middle management,
  which is who drinks white wine.
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