sulky

[suhl-kee]
adjective, sulkier, sulkiest.
1.
marked by or given to sulking; sullen.
2.
gloomy or dull: sulky weather.
noun, plural sulkies.
3.
a light, two-wheeled, one-horse carriage for one person.

Origin:
1735–45; akin to Old English solcen- lazy (in solcennes laziness), Frisian (N dial.) sulkig sulky

sulkily, adverb
sulkiness, noun
unsulkily, adverb
unsulkiness, noun
unsulky, adjective


1. moody, surly, morose, churlish.


1. good-humored, good-natured.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
sulky1 (ˈsʌlkɪ)
 
adj , sulkier, sulkiest
1.  sullen, withdrawn, or moody, through or as if through resentment
2.  dull or dismal: sulky weather
 
[C18: perhaps from obsolete sulke sluggish, probably related to Old English āseolcan to be lazy]
 
'sulkily1
 
adv
 
'sulkiness1
 
n

sulky2 (ˈsʌlkɪ)
 
n , pl sulkies
a light two-wheeled vehicle for one person, usually drawn by one horse
 
[C18: from sulky1, because it can carry only one person]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sulky
"sullen," 1744, probably from O.E. asolcen "idle, lazy, slow," from pp. of aseolcan "become sluggish, be weak or idle" (related to besylcan "be languid"), from P.Gmc. *seklanan (cf. M.H.G. selken "to drop, fall").

sulky
"light carriage with two wheels," 1756, apparently a noun use of sulky (adj.), on notion of "standoffishness," because the carriage has room for only one person.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

sulky

originally a light, open, one-horse, four-wheeled vehicle with its single seat for only one person fixed on its shafts. It is thought to have been invented in the early 19th century by an English physician and was supposedly named for his sulkiness in wishing to sit alone. The sulky was adapted to two wheels and widely used in the United States by doctors and others who had to travel extensively by themselves.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
We dined with him in a sulky silence, after a few ineffectual efforts on my
  part to talk.
He's been surly, sulky, nasty and over the top in belittling you.
Toward the end, she produces one sulky scowl that makes you grateful for a new
  facial expression.
They pose aggressively and their faces are set in a sulky come-on.
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