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supersession

[soo-per-sesh-uh n] /ˌsu pərˈsɛʃ ən/
noun
1.
the act of superseding.
2.
the state of being superseded.
Origin of supersession
1650-1660
1650-60; < Medieval Latin supersessiōn- (stem of supersessiō), equivalent to Latin supersess(us) (past participle of supersedēre to supersede) + -iōn- -ion; see session
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for supersession
Historical Examples
  • Such a League has for its main purpose the supersession of the old principle of balancing the Powers.

    Before the War Viscount Richard Burton Haldane
  • But what you propose will rather take the form of assistance than supersession.

    Lord Randolph Churchill Winston Spencer Churchill
  • The ball was set fairly rolling, and the supersession of ancient modes of communication was a question of time merely.

    Great Britain and Her Queen Anne E. Keeling
  • But, by the very nature of its achievement, it led the way to its own supersession.

    Landmarks in French Literature G. Lytton Strachey
  • And supersession of civil authority was completely against Service Doctrine.

    Little Fuzzy Henry Beam Piper
  • The supersession of madder by aniline dyes has, indeed, for a time almost ruined the small farmers of Vaucluse.

    The Roof of France Matilda Betham-Edwards
  • It marked the rise of a new teaching order and the supersession of the old.

  • This, I submit, is an artificial scheme in supersession of Nature's unit, the individual.

    From Sea to Sea Rudyard Kipling
  • He was accustomed to imagine it lighted and warmed by a presence out of Heaven—that presence was in danger of supersession.

  • The supersession of the law of its own life by the mind is well-nigh unthinkable, if not quite so.

    The Mystery of Space Robert T. Browne
Word Origin and History for supersession
n.

1650s, from Medieval Latin supersessionem (nominative supersessio), noun of action from past participle stem of supersedere (see supersede).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for supersession

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