supreme

1 [suh-preem, soo-]
adjective
1.
highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief.
2.
of the highest quality, degree, character, importance, etc.: supreme courage.
3.
greatest, utmost, or extreme: supreme disgust.
4.
last or final; ultimate.

Origin:
1510–20; < Latin suprēmus, superlative of superus upper, adj. derivative of super (see super-)

supremely, adverb
supremeness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged

supreme

2 [suh-preem, -preym, soo-]
noun
suprême ( def 3 ).

suprême

[suh-preem, -preym, soo-; French sy-prem]
noun
1.
Also called sauce suprême. a velouté made with a rich chicken stock.
2.
Also called suprême de volaille. a dish prepared or served with this sauce, especially boned chicken breast.
3.
Also, supreme.
a.
a bowl or the like designed for the serving of cold foods in an inner container that is nestled in cracked ice.
b.
a dessert or appetizer served in such a container.

Origin:
< French < Latin suprēmus supreme1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To supreme
Collins
World English Dictionary
supreme (sʊˈpriːm, sjʊ-)
 
adj
1.  of highest status or power: a supreme tribunal
2.  (usually prenominal) of highest quality, importance, etc: supreme endeavour
3.  greatest in degree; extreme: supreme folly
4.  (prenominal) final or last, esp being last in one's life or progress; ultimate: the supreme judgment
 
[C16: from Latin suprēmus highest, from superus that is above, from super above]
 
su'premely
 
adv
 
su'premeness
 
n

suprême (sʊˈpriːm, -ˈprɛm, sjʊ-)
 
n
1.  Also called: suprême sauce a rich velouté sauce made with a base of veal or chicken stock, with cream or egg yolks added
2.  the best or most delicate part of meat, esp the breast and wing of chicken, cooked in suprême sauce
 
[French: supreme]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

supreme
1523, from M.Fr. suprême, from L. supremus "highest," superlative of superus "situated above," from super "above" (see super-). Supreme Being first attested 1699; Supreme Court is from 1709. Supremacist is attested from 1959, originally with ref. to racial beliefs.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The second law will rule supreme though gravity can interfere.
He was a poet-naturalist-and, of course, a supreme self-dramatist.
The king is an absolute monarch with supreme executive, legislative, and
  judicial powers.
The cross-country trip is the supreme example of the journey as the destination.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;