swathe

1 [swoth, sweyth]
verb (used with object), swathed, swathing.
1.
to wrap, bind, or swaddle with bands of some material; wrap up closely or fully.
2.
to bandage.
3.
to enfold or envelop, as wrappings do.
4.
to wrap (cloth, rope, etc.) around something.
noun
5.
a band of linen or the like in which something is wrapped; wrapping; bandage.

Origin:
before 1050; (noun) Middle English; Old English *swæth or *swath (in swathum dative plural); cf. swaddle; (v.) Middle English swathen, late Old English swathian, derivative of the noun; cognate with Old Norse svatha

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swathe

2 [swoth, sweyth]
noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
swath or swathe (swɔːθ, sweɪð)
 
n , pl swaths, swathes
1.  the width of one sweep of a scythe or of the blade of a mowing machine
2.  the strip cut by either of these in one course
3.  the quantity of cut grass, hay, or similar crop left in one course of such mowing
4.  a long narrow strip or belt
 
[Old English swæth; related to Old Norse svath smooth patch]
 
swathe or swathe (swɔːθ, sweɪð, swɔːðz)
 
n
 
[Old English swæth; related to Old Norse svath smooth patch]

swathe (sweɪð)
 
vb
1.  to bandage (a wound, limb, etc), esp completely
2.  to wrap a band, garment, etc, around, esp so as to cover completely; swaddle
3.  to envelop
 
n
4.  a bandage or wrapping
5.  a variant spelling of swath
 
[Old English swathian; related to swæthel swaddling clothes, Old High German swedil, Dutch zwadel; see swaddle]
 
'swathable
 
adj
 
'swatheable
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

swathe
O.E. swaþian "to swathe," from swaðu "track, trace, band" (see swath). The noun meaning "infant's swaddling bands" was found in O.E. as swaþum (dative plural).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The ambiance is slightly dressy, but a wide swathe of society frequents the
  restaurant and casual clothing is fine.
The drops cut a wide swathe across the world, with exports plummeting in rich
  and poor countries alike.
The tea-partiers' gripes are shared by a huge swathe of the electorate.
The blood of its unsung martyrs will flow across the land leaving a crimson
  swathe, from border to border.
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