Try Our Apps


Pore Over vs. Pour Over


[swahyn] /swaɪn/
noun, plural swine.
any stout, cloven-hoofed artiodactyl of the Old World family Suidae, having a thick hide sparsely covered with coarse hair, a disklike snout, and an often short, tasseled tail: now of worldwide distribution and hunted or raised for its meat and other products.
Compare hog, pig1 , wild boar.
the domestic hog, Sus scrofa.
a coarse, gross, or brutishly sensual person.
a contemptible person.
Origin of swine
before 900; Middle English; Old English swīn; cognate with German Schwein hog, Latin suīnus (adj.) porcine; akin to sow2
Related forms
swinelike, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for swine
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Though dogs and swine may join in generating, it followeth not men or women may join with them.

  • swine were the natural companions of the prodigal, and the sooner he was with them the better!

    Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald
  • How the fetid goat and the swine wallowing in the mire speak to the lecherous man and the drunkard!

    Curiosities of Heat Lyman B. Tefft
  • He had been ruminating on Gubblum's observation about the swine ring.

    A Son of Hagar Sir Hall Caine
  • His library consisted of cookery books; and all the tongues he knew, were tongues of swine and oxen.

British Dictionary definitions for swine


(pl) swines. a coarse or contemptible person
(pl) swine another name for a pig
Derived Forms
swinelike, adjective
swinish, adjective
swinishly, adverb
swinishness, noun
Word Origin
Old English swīn; related to Old Norse svīn, Gothic swein, Latin suīnus relating to swine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for swine

Old English swin "pig, hog," from Proto-Germanic *swinan (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian Middle Low German, Old High German swin, Middle Dutch swijn, Dutch zwijn, German Schwein), neuter adjective (with suffix *-ino-) from PIE *su- (see sow (n.)). The native word, largely ousted by pig. Applied to persons from late 14c. Phrase pearls before swine (mid-14c.) is from Matt. vii:6; an early English formation of it was:

Ne ge ne wurpen eowre meregrotu toforan eo wrum swynon. [c.1000]
The Latin word was confused in French with marguerite "daisy" (the "pearl" of the field), and in Dutch the expression became "roses before swine."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
swine in the Bible

(Heb. hazir), regarded as the most unclean and the most abhorred of all animals (Lev. 11:7; Isa. 65:4; 66:3, 17; Luke 15:15, 16). A herd of swine were drowned in the Sea of Galilee (Luke 8:32, 33). Spoken of figuratively in Matt. 7:6 (see Prov. 11:22). It is frequently mentioned as a wild animal, and is evidently the wild boar (Arab. khanzir), which is common among the marshes of the Jordan valley (Ps. 80:13).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with swine
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for swine

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for swine

Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for swine