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swivel

[swiv-uh l] /ˈswɪv əl/
noun
1.
a fastening device that allows the thing fastened to turn around freely upon it, especially to turn in a full circle.
2.
such a device consisting of two parts, each of which turns around independently, as a compound link of a chain, one part of which turns freely in the other by means of a headed pin or the like.
3.
a pivoted support allowing a gun to turn around in a horizontal plane.
4.
5.
a device attached to a loom and used as a shuttle to weave extra threads in the production of small figures, especially dots.
verb (used with object), swiveled, swiveling or (especially British) swivelled, swivelling.
6.
to turn or pivot on or as if on a swivel:
He swiveled his chair around.
7.
to fasten by a swivel; furnish with a swivel.
verb (used without object), swiveled, swiveling or (especially British) swivelled, swivelling.
8.
to turn on or if as on a swivel.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English (noun), equivalent to swiv- (weak stem of Old English swīfan to revolve; cognate with Old Norse svīfa to turn) + -el instrumental suffix
Related forms
swivellike, adjective
unswivel, verb (used with object), unswiveled, unswiveling or (especially British) unswivelled, unswivelling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for swivel
  • The machine has a swivel head that gets under appliances, furniture and into corners, and comes with a replaceable water filter.
  • Also, the scoops swivel out of the way if they encounter anything solid, so the dredge does not destroy such protuberances.
  • It gives you plenty of room and can be easily drilled to mount a swivel seat.
  • The keypads would necessarily swivel on the straps for easy use in both positions.
  • Say, for example, you invent a four-legged swivel chair.
  • And in addition to the wheels on the bottom, for scooting around the room, the chair will swivel.
  • We're invited to perch in a high-backed white metal swivel chair.
  • And the scoops swivel out of the way if they encounter anything solid, so the dredge does not destroy such protuberances.
  • After every ten steps or so, the marines swivel round and walk backwards, giving themselves a maximum field of vision.
  • But it's too bad our intrepid reporter never got up from his swivel chair to interview actual teenagers.
British Dictionary definitions for swivel

swivel

/ˈswɪvəl/
noun
1.
a coupling device which allows an attached object to turn freely
2.
such a device made of two parts which turn independently, such as a compound link of a chain
3.
  1. a pivot on which is mounted a gun that may be swung from side to side in a horizontal plane
  2. Also called swivel gun. the gun itself
verb -els, -elling, -elled (US) -els, -eling, -eled
4.
to turn or swing on or as if on a pivot
5.
(transitive) to provide with, secure by, or support with a swivel
Derived Forms
swivel-like, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old English swīfan to turn; see swift
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for swivel
swivel
1307, from frequentative form of stem of O.E. verb swifan "to move in a course, sweep" (a class I strong verb), from P.Gmc. *swipanan (cf. O.Fris. swiva "to be uncertain," O.N. svifa "to rove, ramble, drift"), from PIE base *swei- "swing, bend, move in a sweeping manner." M.E. swive was the principal slang for "to have sexual intercourse with," a sense that developed c.1300. This probably explains why, though the root is verbal, the verb swivel is not attested in Mod.Eng. until 1794.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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