sycophant

[sik-uh-fuhnt, -fant, sahy-kuh-]
noun
a self-seeking, servile flatterer; fawning parasite.

Origin:
1530–40; < Latin sȳcophanta < Greek sȳkophántēs informer, equivalent to sŷko(n) fig + phan- (stem of phaínein to show) + -tēs agentive suffix

sycophantic, sycophantical, sycophantish, adjective
sycophantically, sycophantishly, adverb
sycophantism, noun


toady, yes man, flunky, fawner, flatterer.
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World English Dictionary
sycophant (ˈsɪkəfənt)
 
n
a person who uses flattery to win favour from individuals wielding influence; toady
 
[C16: from Latin sӯcophanta, from Greek sukophantēs, literally: the person showing a fig, apparently referring to the fig sign used in making an accusation, from sukon fig + phainein to show; sense probably developed from ``accuser'' to ``informer, flatterer'']
 
'sycophancy
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sycophant
1537 (in L. form sycophanta), "informer, talebearer, slanderer," from L. sycophanta, from Gk. sykophantes, originally "one who shows the fig," from sykon "fig" + phanein "to show." "Showing the fig" was a vulgar gesture made by sticking the thumb between two fingers, a display which vaguely resembles
a fig, itself symbolic of a cunt (sykon also meant "vulva"). The story goes that prominent politicians in ancient Greece held aloof from such inflammatory gestures, but privately urged their followers to taunt their opponents. The sense of "mean, servile flatterer" is first recorded in Eng. 1575.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But history will likely remember him as the ultimate sycophant, the loyal sidekick.
The hiring committee then consisted of the head and one sycophant who always agreed with him.
By a revolution in the state, the fawning sycophant of yesterday is converted into the austere critic of the present hour.
Yet she was no sycophant, she had her own brand of mockery and shared his insouciance about patronage.
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