syenite

syenite

[sahy-uh-nahyt]
noun
a granular igneous rock consisting chiefly of orthoclase and oligoclase with hornblende, biotite, or augite.

Origin:
1790–1800; < Latin syēnītēs (lapis) (stone) of Syene < Greek syēnī́tēs (líthos); see -ite1

syenitic [sahy-uh-nit-ik] , adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To syenite
Collins
World English Dictionary
syenite (ˈsaɪəˌnaɪt)
 
n
a light-coloured coarse-grained plutonic igneous rock consisting of feldspars with hornblende or biotite
 
[C18: from French syénite, from Latin syēnītēs lapis stone from Syene (Aswan), where it was originally quarried]
 
syenitic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
syenite   (sī'ə-nīt')  Pronunciation Key 
A light-colored, coarse-grained igneous rock consisting primarily of alkali feldspar together with some mafic minerals, especially hornblende. Unlike most igneous rocks, syenite has little or no quartz. It is believed to form from the cooling of magma that forms at very high temperatures and at great depths. It is the coarse-grained equivalent of trachyte.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

syenite

any of a class of intrusive igneous rocks essentially composed of an alkali feldspar and a ferromagnesian mineral. A special group of alkali syenites is characterized by the presence of a feldspathoid mineral such as nepheline, leucite, cancrinite, or sodalite (see nepheline syenite). Chemically, syenites contain a moderate amount of silica, relatively large amounts of alkalies, and alumina. The name was first used by Pliny the Elder.

Learn more about syenite with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature