syntactic

[sin-tak-tik]
adjective
1.
of or pertaining to syntax.
2.
consisting of or noting morphemes that are combined in the same order as they would be if they were separate words in a corresponding construction: The word blackberry, which consists of an adjective followed by a noun, is a syntactic compound.
Also, syntactical.


Origin:
1570–80; < Neo-Latin syntacticus < Greek syntaktikós, equivalent to syntakt(ós) ordered, arranged together, verbid of syntássein to arrange together (syn- syn- + tag-, base of tássein to arrange + -tos adj. suffix) + -ikos -ic; see tactic

syntactically, adverb
nonsyntactic, adjective
nonsyntactical, adjective
nonsyntactically, adverb
unsyntactic, adjective
unsyntactical, adjective
unsyntactically, adverb
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World English Dictionary
syntactic (sɪnˈtæktɪk)
 
adj
1.  Also: synˈtactical relating to or determined by syntax
2.  logic, linguistics describable wholly with respect to the grammatical structure of an expression or the rules of well-formedness of a formal system
 
syntactically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
The fundamental syntactic relations must be unambiguously expressed.
As a result, today's top bows typically have a core of syntactic foam.
Your syntactic wobbliness should be forgiven, though only up to a point.
In humanity's efforts to teach language to primates, researchers had been unable to see such a syntactic ability in them.
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