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tare1

[tair] /tɛər/
noun
1.
any of various vetches, especially Vicia sativa.
2.
the seed of a vetch.
3.
Bible. a noxious weed, probably the darnel.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English: vetch; akin to Dutch tarwe wheat

tare2

[tair] /tɛər/
noun
1.
the weight of the wrapping, receptacle, or conveyance containing goods.
2.
a deduction from the gross weight to allow for this.
3.
the weight of a vehicle without cargo, passengers, etc.
4.
a counterweight used in chemical analysis to balance the weight of a container.
5.
a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter T.
verb (used with object), tared, taring.
6.
to ascertain, note, or allow for the tare of.
Origin
1480-90; < Middle French (equivalent to Medieval Latin, Italian, Provençal, Spanish, Portuguese tara, Spanish atara) ≪ Arabic ṭarḥah what one throws away, derivative of ṭaraḥa to throw away

tare3

[tair] /tɛər/
verb, Archaic.
1.
simple past tense and past participle of tear2 .

tear1

[teer] /tɪər/
noun
1.
a drop of the saline, watery fluid continually secreted by the lacrimal glands between the surface of the eye and the eyelid, serving to moisten and lubricate these parts and keep them clear of foreign particles.
Synonyms: teardrop.
2.
this fluid appearing in or flowing from the eye as the result of emotion, especially grief:
to shed tears.
3.
something resembling or suggesting a tear, as a drop of a liquid or a tearlike mass of a solid substance, especially having a spherical or globular shape at one end and tapering to a point at the other:
teardrop earrings.
4.
Glassmaking. a decorative air bubble enclosed in a glass vessel; air bell.
5.
tears, grief; sorrow.
verb (used without object)
6.
to fill up and overflow with tears, as the eyes (often followed by up):
My eyes were tearing in the wind. He teared up when he heard the news.
Idioms
7.
in tears, weeping:
He was in tears over the death of his dog.
Origin
before 900; (noun) Middle English teer, Old English tēar, tehher, taeher; cognate with Old High German zahar, Old Norse tār, Gothic tagr, Greek dákry, Latin lacrima (see lachrymal); (v.) Middle English teren, Old English teheran, in teherende (gerund), derivative of the noun

tear2

[tair] /tɛər/
verb (used with object), tore or (Archaic) tare, torn or (Archaic) tare, tearing.
1.
to pull apart or in pieces by force, especially so as to leave ragged or irregular edges.
Synonyms: rend, rip, rive.
Antonyms: mend, repair, sew.
2.
to pull or snatch violently; wrench away with force:
to tear wrappings from a package; to tear a book from someone's hands.
3.
to distress greatly:
anguish that tears the heart.
Synonyms: break, crack, shatter, afflict.
4.
to divide or disrupt:
a country torn by civil war.
Synonyms: disunite, split, splinter.
Antonyms: unite, reunite, join, bind.
5.
to wound or injure by or as if by rending; lacerate.
Synonyms: cut, mangle, slash.
6.
to produce or effect by rending:
to tear a hole in one's coat.
7.
to remove by force or effort:
to be unable to tear oneself from a place.
verb (used without object), tore or (Archaic) tare, torn or (Archaic) tare, tearing.
8.
to become torn.
9.
to make a tear or rent.
10.
to move or behave with force, violent haste, or energy:
The wind tore through the trees; cars tearing up and down the highway; I was tearing around all afternoon trying to find sandals for the beach.
noun
11.
the act of tearing.
12.
a rent or fissure.
Synonyms: rip, rift, rupture.
13.
a rage or passion; violent flurry or outburst.
14.
Informal. a spree.
Verb phrases
15.
tear at,
  1. to pluck violently at; attempt to tear:
    She tore at the bandages until they loosened.
  2. to distress; afflict:
    remorse that tears at one's soul.
16.
tear down,
  1. to pull down; destroy; demolish.
  2. to disparage or discredit:
    to tear down one's friends behind their backs.
17.
tear into, Informal.
  1. to attack impulsively and heedlessly:
    He tore into the food with a will.
  2. to attack verbally:
    She tore into him for being late for dinner.
18.
tear off, Slang. to perform or do, especially rapidly or casually:
to tear off a poem; to tear off a set of tennis.
19.
tear up,
  1. to tear into small shreds:
    He tore up the drawings because she had criticized them.
    Synonyms: rip up.
  2. to cancel or annul:
    to tear up a contract.
Idioms
20.
tear it, Slang. to ruin all hope; spoil everything.
21.
tear one's hair, to manifest extreme anxiety, grief, anger, or frustration:
I'm so upset, I could just tear my hair out.
Also, tear one's hair out.
Origin
before 900; Middle English teren (v.), Old English teran; cognate with Dutch teren, German zehren to consume, Gothic distairan to destroy, Greek dérein to flay
Related forms
tearable, adjective
tearableness, noun
tearer, noun
untearable, adjective
Synonym Study
1. Tear, rend, rip mean to pull apart. To tear is to split the fibers of something by pulling apart, usually so as to leave ragged or irregular edges: to tear open a letter. Rend implies force or violence in tearing apart or in pieces: to rend one's clothes in grief. Rip implies vigorous tearing asunder, especially along a seam or line: to rip the sleeves out of a coat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for tare
  • In addition, determine tare weights whenever it is suspected that the present tare weight is no longer applicable.
  • The weight of the packaging materials is referred to as tare weight.
  • The net weight of the shipment shall be obtained by deducting the tare weight from the loaded weight.
  • Multiply the average tare weight of one empty primary container by the number of primary containers in one unit.
  • tare indicates the actual weight of the package, box, or container.
  • Weigh the empty laboratory sample containers which will be placed in the oven to determine their tare weight.
British Dictionary definitions for tare

tare1

/tɛə/
noun
1.
any of various vetch plants, such as Vicia hirsuta (hairy tare) of Eurasia and N Africa
2.
the seed of any of these plants
3.
(Bible) a troublesome weed, thought to be the darnel
Word Origin
C14: of unknown origin

tare2

/tɛə/
noun
1.
the weight of the wrapping or container in which goods are packed
2.
a deduction from gross weight to compensate for this
3.
the weight of a vehicle without its cargo, passengers, etc
4.
an empty container used as a counterbalance in determining net weight
verb
5.
(transitive) to weigh (a package, etc) in order to calculate the amount of tare
Word Origin
C15: from Old French: waste, from Medieval Latin tara, from Arabic tarhah something discarded, from taraha to reject

tear1

/tɪə/
noun
1.
a drop of the secretion of the lacrimal glands See tears
2.
something shaped like a hanging drop: a tear of amber
Also called (esp Brit) teardrop
Derived Forms
tearless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English tēar, related to Old Frisian, Old Norse tār, Old High German zahar, Greek dakri

tear2

/tɛə/
verb tears, tearing, tore, torn
1.
to cause (material, paper, etc) to come apart or (of material, etc) to come apart; rip
2.
(transitive) to make (a hole or split) in (something): to tear a hole in a dress
3.
(intransitive) often foll by along. to hurry or rush: to tear along the street
4.
(transitive; usually foll by away or from) to remove or take by force
5.
when intr, often foll by at. to cause pain, distress, or anguish (to): it tore at my heartstrings to see the starving child
6.
(informal) tear one's hair, to be angry, frustrated, very worried, etc
noun
7.
a hole, cut, or split
8.
the act of tearing
9.
a great hurry; rush
10.
(slang) on a tear, showing a sudden burst of energy
Derived Forms
tearable, adjective
tearer, noun
Word Origin
Old English teran; related to Old Saxon terian, Gothic gatairan to destroy, Old High German zeran to destroy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for tare
n.

"kind of fodder plant, vetch," early 14c., perhaps cognate with Middle Dutch tarwe "wheat," from Proto-Germanic *tarwo, cognate with Breton draok, Welsh drewg "darnel," Sanskrit durva "a kind of millet grass," Greek darata, daratos "bread," Lithuanian dirva "a wheat-field." Used in 2nd Wyclif version (1388) of Matt. xxiii:25 to render Greek zizania as a weed among corn (earlier darnel and cockle had been used in this place); hence figurative use for "something noxious sown among something good" (1711).

"difference between gross and net weight," late 15c., from Middle French tare "wastage in goods, deficiency, imperfection" (15c.), from Italian tara, from Arabic tarah, literally "thing deducted or rejected," from taraha "to reject."

tear

n.

"water from the eye," Old English tear, from earlier teahor, tæhher, from Proto-Germanic *takh-, *tagr- (cf. Old Norse, Old Frisian tar, Old High German zahar, German Zähre, Gothic tagr "tear"), from PIE *dakru-/*draku- (cf. Latin lacrima, Old Latin dacrima, Irish der, Welsh deigr, Greek dakryma). Tear gas first recorded 1917.

"act of ripping or rending," 1660s, from tear (v.1).

v.

"pull apart," Old English teran (class IV strong verb; past tense tær, past participle toren), from Proto-Germanic *teran (cf. Old Saxon terian, Middle Dutch teren "to consume," Old High German zeran "to destroy," German zehren, Gothic ga-tairan "to tear, destroy"), from PIE *der- "tear" (cf. Sanskrit drnati "cleaves, bursts," Greek derein "to flay," Armenian terem "I flay," Old Church Slavonic dera "to burst asunder," Breton darn "piece").

The Old English past tense survived long enough to get into Bible translations as tare before giving place 17c. to tore, which is from the old past participle toren. Sense of "to pull by force" (away from some situation or attachment) is attested from late 13c. To be torn between two things (desires, loyalties, etc.) is from 1871.

1650s, mainly in American English, from tear (n.1). Related: Teared; tearing. Old English verb tæherian did not survive into Middle English.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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tare in Medicine

tear 1 (târ)
n.
A rip or rent in a material or structure.

tear 2 (tēr)
n.
A drop of the clear salty liquid that is secreted by the lacrimal gland of the eye to lubricate the surface between the eyeball and eyelid and to wash away irritants.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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tare in Science
tear
  (tîr)   
A drop of the clear salty liquid secreted by glands (lacrimal glands) in the eyes. Tears wet the membrane covering the eye and help rid the eye of irritating substances.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for tare

tea pad

noun phrase

A place where marijuana smokers gather (1950s+ Narcotics)


tea party

noun phrase
  1. A gathering where marijuana is smoked: Marijuana ''tea parties'' are little things (1940s+ Narcotics)
  2. An easy, pleasant, safe occasion •Most often used in the negative: It wasn't exactly a brawl, but the meeting was no tea party either (1960s+)

tear 1

noun

A drinking spree; bender, binge: Fred wanted to go on a little tear in the big town (1869+)

Related Terms

on a tear


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with tare
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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4
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