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temblor

[tem-bler, -blawr; Spanish tem-blawr] /ˈtɛm blər, -blɔr; Spanish tɛmˈblɔr/
noun, plural temblors Spanish, temblores
[tem-blaw-res] /tɛmˈblɔ rɛs/ (Show IPA)
1.
a tremor; earthquake.
Origin
1895-1900
1895-1900, Americanism; < Spanish: literally, a quaking, equivalent to tembl(ar) to quake (perhaps ≪ Latin timēre to fear and Late Latin tremulāre to quake; see tremble) + -or -or1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for temblor
  • Some-times, though, a temblor relieves stress on one part of the fault but increases it farther down the line.
  • The temblor generated tsunamis that slammed many coastal towns, killing hundreds.
  • They'd be unlikely to stand up to a significant temblor.
British Dictionary definitions for temblor

temblor

/ˈtɛmblə; -blɔː/
noun (pl) temblors, temblores (tɛmˈblɔːreɪz)
1.
(mainly US) an earthquake or earth tremor
Word Origin
C19: American Spanish, from Spanish temblar to shake, tremble
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for temblor
n.

earthquake, 1876, from American Spanish temblor "earthquake," from Spanish temblor, literally "a trembling," from temblar "to tremble," from Vulgar Latin *tremulare (see tremble).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
14
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