temerity

[tuh-mer-i-tee]
noun
reckless boldness; rashness.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English temeryte < Latin temeritās hap, chance, rashness, equivalent to temer(e) by chance, rashly + -itās -ity


audacity, effrontery, foolhardiness.
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World English Dictionary
temerity (tɪˈmɛrɪtɪ)
 
n
rashness or boldness
 
[C15: from Latin temeritās accident, from temere at random]
 
temerarious
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

temerity
early 15c., from M.Fr. témérité (15c.), from L. temeritatem (nom. temeritas) "blind chance, accident, rashness," from temere "by chance, blindly, casually, rashly," related to tenebrae "darkness," from PIE base *temes- "dark" (cf. Skt. tamas- "darkness," tamsrah "dark;" Avestan temah
"darkness;" Lith. tamsa "darkness," tamsus "dark;" O.C.S. tima "darkness;" O.H.G. dinstar "dark;" O.Ir. temel "darkness").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Maybe it's high time someone had the temerity to call this sacred cow a
  nightmare.
The gist: some restaurants had the temerity to serve halal without telling
  customers.
Then they congratulate themselves on their temerity.
With careers having become so much more precarious, the temerity of originality
  is all the more impressive.
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