thiazole

thiazole

[thahy-uh-zohl]
noun Chemistry.
1.
a colorless, slightly water-miscible liquid, C 3 H 3 NS, having a disagreeable odor.
2.
any of various derivatives of this substance, used as dyes or reagents.

Origin:
1885–90; thi- + azole

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World English Dictionary
thiazole or thiazol (ˈθaɪəˌzəʊl, ˈθaɪəˌzɒl)
 
n
1.  a colourless liquid with a pungent smell that contains a ring system composed of three carbon atoms, a sulphur atom, and a nitrogen atom. It is used in dyes and fungicides. Formula: C3H3NS
2.  any of a group of compounds derived from this substance that are used in dyes
 
thiazol or thiazol
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
thiazole   (thī'ə-zōl')  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Any of a class of organic compounds containing a ring that consists of three carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and one sulfur atom. Thiamine, penicillin and its derivatives, various other drugs, and numerous dyes are thiazoles.

  2. A colorless or pale yellow liquid used in making dyes and fungicides. Chemical formula: C3H3NS.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

thiazole

any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series characterized by a ring structure composed of three carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and one sulfur atom. This ring structure occurs in such important biologically active natural products as thiamine (vitamin B1), bacitracin, and the penicillins, and in numerous synthetic drugs, dyes, and industrial chemicals

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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