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Thorpe

[thawrp] /θɔrp/
noun
1.
James Francis ("Jim") 1888–1953, U.S. track-and-field athlete and football and baseball player.

thorp

or thorpe

[thawrp] /θɔrp/
noun, Archaic.
1.
a hamlet; village.
Origin of thorp
900
before 900; Middle English, Old English; cognate with German Dorf, Old Norse thorp village, Gothic thaurp field
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for Thorpe
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • What's the answer, except that Thorpe washed it and put it away?

    The Come Back Carolyn Wells
  • Thorpe took a chair, and the two men exchanged a silent, intent look.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • Thorpe never finished the simile, for it could hardly have been a proper one.

    Jane Austen, Her Life and Letters William Austen-Leigh and Richard Arthur Austen-Leigh
  • "Oh, it'll mount up to considerable, as it stands," said Thorpe.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • “They killed each other,” Thorpe broke in, nodding his head in the positive manner he affected.

British Dictionary definitions for Thorpe

Thorpe

/θɔːp/
noun
1.
Ian. born 1982, Australian swimmer; won three gold medals at the 2000 Olympic Games, six gold medals at the 2002 Commonwealth Games, and two gold medals at the 2004 Olympic Games.
2.
James Francis. 1888–1953, American football player and athlete: Olympic pentathlon and decathlon champion (1912)
3.
Jeremy. born 1929, British politician; leader of the Liberal party (1967–76)

thorp

/θɔːp/
noun (in place names)
1.
a small village
Word Origin
Old English; related to Old Norse thorp village, Old High German dorf, Gothic thaurp
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Thorpe

thorp

n.

Old English ðorp "village, hamlet, farm, estate," reinforced by Old Norse ðorp, both from Proto-Germanic *thurpa- (cf. Old Frisian thorp, Frisian terp, Middle Dutch, Dutch dorp, German dorf "village," Gothic þaurp "estate, land, field"), probably from PIE root *treb- "dwelling." Preserved in place names ending in -thorp, -thrup.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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