timorous

[tim-er-uhs]
adjective
1.
full of fear; fearful: The noise made them timorous.
2.
subject to fear; timid.
3.
characterized by or indicating fear: a timorous whisper.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin timōrōsus (Latin timōr- (stem of timor) fear + -ōsus -ous)

timorously, adverb
timorousness, noun
overtimorous, adjective
overtimorously, adverb
overtimorousness, noun
untimorous, adjective
untimorously, adverb
untimorousness, noun


1. See cowardly.
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World English Dictionary
timorous (ˈtɪmərəs)
 
adj
1.  fearful or timid
2.  indicating fear or timidity
 
[C15: from Old French temoros, from Medieval Latin timōrōsus, from Latin timor fear, from timēre to be afraid]
 
'timorously
 
adv
 
'timorousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

timorous
mid-15c., from O.Fr. temeros (14c.), from M.L. timorosus "fearful," from L. timor "fear," from timere "to fear." Some early sense confused by mistaken identification with M.E. temerous "rash" (see temerity).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The censors are inevitably timorous, possibly cretinous bureaucrats blind or indifferent to art's necessities.
We are becoming a nation of moles, timorous creatures who scurry through side and subterranean entrances.
It attached itself to everything that was done order was enforced with no timorous authority.
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