tolerable

[tol-er-uh-buhl]
adjective
1.
capable of being tolerated; endurable: His arrogance is no longer tolerable.
2.
fairly good; not bad.
3.
Informal. in fair health.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin tolerābilis, equivalent to tolerā(re) to endure + -bilis -ble

tolerableness, tolerability, noun
tolerably, adverb
nontolerable, adjective
nontolerableness, noun
nontolerably, adverb
untolerable, adjective
untolerableness, noun
untolerably, adverb


1. bearable, supportable. 2. passable, middling, indifferent, so-so.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tolerable (ˈtɒlərəbəl)
 
adj
1.  able to be tolerated; endurable
2.  permissible
3.  informal fairly good
 
'tolerableness
 
n
 
tolera'bility
 
n
 
'tolerably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tolerable
1422, "bearable," from M.Fr. tolerable (14c.), from L. tolerabilis "that may be endured," from tolerare "to tolerate" (see toleration). Meaning "moderate, middling, not bad" is recorded from 1548.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
If this were done merely in marketing materials, it might be tolerable.
And perhaps it is tolerable to so many because it has become so familiar.
Many will say that nothing more than zero radioactive releases is ever
  tolerable.
Improved phone ergonomics make longer calls tolerable.
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