torpor

[tawr-per]
noun
1.
sluggish inactivity or inertia.
2.
lethargic indifference; apathy.
3.
a state of suspended physical powers and activities.
4.
dormancy, as of a hibernating animal.

Origin:
1600–10; < Latin: numbness, equivalent to torp(ēre) to be stiff or numb + -or -or1


2. stolidity, listlessness, lethargy. 4. sleepiness, slumber, drowsiness.
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World English Dictionary
torpor (ˈtɔːpə)
 
n
a state of torpidity
 
[C17: from Latin: inactivity, from torpēre to be motionless]
 
torpor'ific
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

torpor
1607, from L. torpor "numbness," from torpere "be numb," from PIE base *ster- "stiff" (cf. O.C.S. trupeti, Lith. tirpstu "to become rigid;" Gk. stereos "solid;" O.E. steorfan "to die;" see sterile).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

torpor tor·por (tôr'pər)
n.

  1. A state of mental or physical inactivity or insensibility.

  2. Lethargy; apathy.


tor'po·rif'ic (-pə-rĭf'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

torpor

a state of lowered body temperature and metabolic activity assumed by many animals in response to adverse environmental conditions, especially cold and heat. The torpid state may last overnight, as in temperate-zone hummingbirds and some insects and reptiles; or it may last for months, in the case of true hibernation and the winter torpor of many cold-blooded vertebrates.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Hopefully, they will awaken from their long torpor and rise to the challenges
  of the times.
Those who are content need robust political speech to rouse them from their
  civic torpor.
She was kneeling on the floor, ice in her hair, lost in some kind of
  hypothermic torpor.
The costly education in politics had led to political torpor.
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