totally

[toht-l-ee]
adverb
wholly; entirely; completely.

Origin:
1500–10; total + -ly

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
total (ˈtəʊtəl)
 
n
1.  the whole, esp regarded as the complete sum of a number of parts
 
adj
2.  complete; absolute: the evening was a total failure; a total eclipse
3.  (prenominal) being or related to a total: the total number of passengers
 
vb (when intr, sometimes foll by to) , -tals, -talling, -talled, -tals, -taling, -taled
4.  to amount: to total six pounds
5.  (tr) to add up: to total a list of prices
6.  slang (tr) to kill or badly injure (someone)
7.  chiefly (US) (tr) to damage (a vehicle) beyond repair
 
[C14: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tōtālis, from Latin tōtus all]
 
'totally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
Every once in awhile, a totally innovative product comes along that completely
  wows us.
The millennium computer bug is totally predictable in its timing, but
  completely unpredictable in its effects.
It totally disarmed me and at the same time made me feel completely embraced.
The old ways should not be totally dismissed either.
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